Menopause News 2023 What’s Hot showcases some evidence-based menopause news by menopause societies and international sources.

Menopause News December 2023 What’s Hot

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Menopause News November 2023

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Last Updated: 01 February 2024 – Last Revised: 10 October 2023

Menopause Videos 2023 What’s Hot showcases some evidence-based menopause videos by menopause societies and other international sources.

British Menopause Society

International Menopause Society

Menopause Society

NHS Inform (Scotland)

Society for Women’s Health Research (United States)

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If you would like to find out what information in menopause videos 2023 is applicable to you, it may be in your best interest to choose to talk to your health care provider about this.

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Last Updated: 31 December 2023 – Last Revised: 01 December 2023

The International Menopause Society have announced “The theme for World Menopause Day 2023 is Cardiovascular Disease”.

World Menopause Day

When is World Menopause Day (WMD) held?

In World Menopause Day the International Menopause Society (IMS) explain:

“World Menopause Day is held every year on the 18th of October. The purpose of the day is to raise awareness of the menopause and the support options available for improving health and wellbeing”.

World Menopause Day 2023

What is the theme for WMD 2023?

In World Menopause Day the IMS have announced:

“The theme for World Menopause Day 2023 is Cardiovascular Disease”.
World Menopause Day 2023 What’s Hot

Patient Information Leaflet

What do the IMS explain in their WMD 2023 Patient Information Leaflet about cardiovascular disease?

World Menopause Day 2023 What’s HotOn page two in their Patient Information Leaflet – Cardiovascular Disease: What Women Need to Know the IMS explain:

“Breast cancer is often believed to be the number one cause of death and disability in women. In reality, it is cardiovascular disease. The number of cases of cardiovascular disease is high… and continuing to rise.

But by understanding more about the causes and impacts of cardiovascular disease, you can take steps to reduce your risk.

Here’s what every woman needs to know…”.

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Last Updated: 01 February 2024 – Last Revised: 01 February 2024

“The theme for World Menopause Day 2022 is Cognition and Mood”. Yes. “Brain fog is normal and common at midlife“.

World Menopause Day

World Menopause Day 2022 What’s HotWhen is World Menopause Day (WMD) held?

In World Menopause Day the International Menopause Society (IMS) explain:

“World Menopause Day is held every year on the 18th October. The purpose of the day is to raise awareness of the menopause and the support options available for improving health and wellbeing”.

World Menopause Day 2022

What is the theme chosen by the IMS for WMD 2022?

In World Menopause Day: Engagement Toolkit – Theme for 2022 the IMS announce:

“The theme chosen by the IMS for World Menopause Day 2022 is Brain Fog and Memory Difficulties in Menopause”.

Patient Information Leaflet

What do the IMS note in their Patient Information Leaflet about brain fog and memory difficulties in menopause, for WMD 2022?

On page two in their Patient Information Leaflet – Brain Fog and Memory Difficulties in Menopause: What Is Menopausal Brain Fog? the IMS elaborate on:

“Research studies find that women’s memory does in fact change at menopause, so these complaints are real – it’s not in your imagination. Brain fog is normal and common at midlife. These bothersome problems can affect your quality of life. However, they are usually quite mild and will improve post menopause”.

Brain Fog

What is brain fog?

On page two in their Patient Information Leaflet – Brain Fog and Memory Difficulties in Menopause: What Is Menopausal Brain Fog? the IMS’s definition is:

“Menopause brain fog is a group of symptoms that happens around the time of the menopause, including difficulty remembering words and numbers, disruptions in daily life (misplacing items like keys), trouble concentrating (absent mindedness, losing a train of thought, being more easily distracted), difficulty switching between tasks, forgetting the reason for doing something (like why you came into a room), and forgetting appointments and events”.

IMS White Paper

What is the IMS White Paper for WMD 2022?

In World Menopause Day the IMS include their Brain Fog In Menopause: A Health-Care Professional’s Guide for Decision-Making and Counseling on Cognition: The IMS White Paper.

Videos and Podcasts

What are the IMS’s Videos and Podcasts for WMD 2022?

In Videos and Podcasts the IMS include:

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Last Updated: 19 March 2023 – Last Revised: 01 October 2022

Menopause and Medical Cannabis explains how “no studies to date have examined the safety and efficacy of medical cannabis to alleviate menopause-related symptoms”.

Menopause-Related Symptoms

Have studies to date, examined the safety and efficacy of medical cannabis (MC) to alleviate menopause-related symptoms?

No. In More Women Turning to Medical Cannabis for Relief of Menopause Symptoms, published 03 August 2022, the North American Menopause Society note:

“Several observational studies previously demonstrated that medical cannabis use is associated with various clinical benefits, including improvements on measures of anxiety, mood, sleep, and pain, as well as cognitive improvement after treatment. But no studies to date have examined the safety and efficacy of medical cannabis to alleviate menopause-related symptoms”.

Perimenopause and Postmenopause

Did A Survey of Medical Cannabis Use During Perimenopause and Postmenopause, published 02 August 2022, examine the safety and efficacy of MC to alleviate menopause-related symptoms?

No. The Conclusion of the authors of A Survey of Medical Cannabis Use During Perimenopause and Postmenopause: Conclusion, with 258 participants, was:

Menopause and Medical Cannabis“Results suggest that many individuals are currently using MC as an adjunctive treatment for menopause-related symptoms, particularly sleep disturbance and mood/anxiety. Future research should examine the impact of different MC use characteristics (e.g., cannabinoid profiles) on the efficacy of MC use for menopause-related symptoms. Increased severity and prevalence of mood and anxiety symptoms in perimenopausal participants suggest promising targets for clinical trials of cannabinoid-based therapies”.

Healthcare Provider

What should be noted about the use of MC to relieve the symptoms of menopause?

In Cannabis May Offer Relief From Menopause Symptoms: More Research Is Needed To Understand Cannabis Use for Menopausal Symptoms the Open Access Government elaborate on:

“Although some research studies have been done to understand the uses of cannabis in women to relieve the symptoms of menopause, more research needs to be done on the effectiveness of CBD products for menopause relief”.

On page two in More Women Turning To Medical Cannabis for Relief of Menopause Symptoms the NAMS note:

““Given the lack of clinical trial data on the efficacy and safety of medical cannabis for management of menopause symptoms, more research is needed before this treatment can be recommended in clinical practice. Healthcare professionals should query their patients about the use of medical cannabis for menopause symptoms and provide evidence-based recommendations for symptom management,” says Dr. Stephanie Faubion, NAMS medical director”.

What are two of the recommendations included in the Joint Position Statement By the British Menopause Society, Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists and Society for Endocrinology on Best Practice Recommendations for the Care of Women Experiencing the Menopause?

On page two in the Joint Position Statement By the British Menopause Society, Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists and Society for Endocrinology on Best Practice Recommendations for the Care of Women Experiencing the Menopause, first published online 10 June 2022, two of the recommendations are:


Menopause and Medical Cannabis

  • “All women should be able to access advice on how they can optimise their menopause transition and the years beyond. There should be an individualised approach in assessing women experiencing the menopause, with particular reference to lifestyle advice, diet modification as well as discussion of the role of interventions including HRT
  • Women should be advised that implementing or maintaining a healthy lifestyle can improve menopause symptoms. A healthy diet (one low in saturated fat and salt and rich in calcium and vitamin D), stopping smoking, reducing alcohol intake and including regular exercise can be beneficial. Reducing caffeine intake may also improve symptoms”.

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Last Updated: 12 July 2024 – Last Revised: 18 November 2022

World Osteoporosis Day 2023 and Menopause highlights “the importance of a bone-healthy lifestyle” and explains the association between menopause and bone loss.

World Osteoporosis Day 2023 Campaign

What is the 2023 World Osteoporosis Day Campaign on October 20?

In the World Osteoporosis Day’s, Get Involved: About the 2023 World Osteoporosis Day Campaign the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) explain:


World Osteoporosis Day 2023 and Menopause“With this year’s tagline of ‘Build Better Bones’, IOF will highlight the importance of a bone-healthy lifestyle as the foundation for strong bones and a mobile, fracture-free future. New posters and related resources and communications will urge the public and patients to build better bones by ensuring:

  • Regular weight-bearing & muscle-strengthening exercise
  • A nutritious bone-healthy diet and adequate vitamin D
  • No smoking and avoiding excessive alcohol intake”.

Menopause

Is there an association between menopause and bone loss?

In Calcium: Recommended Daily Calcium Intake the (Australian) Jean Hailes for Women’s Health note:

  • “When women go through menopause, there is a rapid loss of bone because of decreased oestrogen and this process may last from 4-8 years after menopause
  • After this period of time the rate of bone loss is reduced and stabilises”.

Premature Menopause

Is there an association between premature menopause and bone loss?

In How To Prevent Osteoporosis After Menopause the (United States) Cleveland Clinic note:

“But typical menopause happens between age 45 and 55, so if you enter menopause before then, you’re also at risk for bone loss at an earlier age than is standard. That includes:

  • Premature menopause (before age 40)
  • Early menopause (before age 45)
  • Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI), formerly called “primary ovarian failure
  • Medical menopause, whether surgically induced or as a result of medical treatment, like chemotherapy”.

Postmenopause

Is there an association between postmenopause and osteoporosis?

On page one in Management of Osteoporosis In Postmenopausal Women: The 2021 Position Statement of the North American Menopause Society: Abstract – Results the North American Menopause Society elaborate on:



“Postmenopausal bone loss, related to estrogen deficiency, is the primary contributor to osteoporosis. Other important risk factors for postmenopausal osteoporosis include advanced age, genetics, smoking, thinness, and many diseases and drugs that impair bone health. An evaluation of these risk factors to identify candidates for osteoporosis screening and recommending nonpharmacologic measures such as good nutrition (especially adequate intake of protein, calcium, and vitamin D), regular physical activity, and avoiding smoking and excessive alcohol consumption are appropriate for all postmenopausal women”.

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Last Updated: 19 October 2023 – Last Revised: 19 October 2023

World Mental Health Day 2023 and Menopause explains how you may be feeling more angry, anxious, depressed or irritable than usual.

World Mental Health Day 2023

What is Mental Health Day 2023 on 10 October?

On the official website of World Mental Health Day the World Federation for Mental Health explain:

“The World Federation for Mental Health, the founder of World Mental Health Day, presents the WFMH Global Campaign 2023. The Global Campaign aims to recognise the 75th Anniversary of WFMH and World Mental Health Day 2023. The campaign and its initiatives will be based on this year’s official theme of World Mental Health Day- ‘Mental Health is a Universal Human Right’”.

World Mental Health Day 2023 and Menopause

Risk

World Mental Health Day 2023 and MenopauseIs the risk of mood changes and symptoms of depression and anxiety higher during perimenopause?

In Menopause and Mental Health, published February 2023, the Australasian Menopause Society (AMS) note:

“While not a problem for everyone transitioning through menopause, the risk of mood changes and symptoms of depression and anxiety are higher during perimenopause, even in women without a history of major depression.

While the risk is higher for women in the age-related and natural menopausal transition, women might also have a higher risk of mood changes after menopause caused by surgery such as hysterectomy or if the ovaries have been removed. Depression also occurs at a higher rate in women with a lack of oestrogen caused by primary ovarian insufficiency”.

Menopause Mental Health Symptoms

What menopause mental health symptoms may we feel?

In Menopause and Mental Health: Mental Health Symptoms Related To Menopause the AMS elaborate on:

“Mental health symptoms related to menopause can include feeling:

  • Irritable
  • Sad
  • Anxious
  • Hopeless
  • Less able to concentrate or focus
  • Tired
  • Unmotivated.

Some women might experience these symptoms in a mild form. Others might have more severe symptoms of depression (including thoughts of suicide) lasting for at least two weeks. This is known as a major depressive episode and is more likely in women who have a history of major depression during their pre-menopausal years”.

In Symptoms of Menopause: Mood & Emotional Health the (Australian) Jean Hailes for Women’s Health (JH) elaborate on:

World Mental Health Day 2023 and Menopause“You may notice that menopause causes your mood to change. This is due to changing hormone levels. You might experience:

  • Irritability
  • Increased anger
  • Low mood
  • Depression and anxiety”

Research suggests that women are more likely to feel depressed during the menopause transition.

Women who have a history of depression or premenstrual syndrome (PMS) may be more likely to develop depression during this time”.

Self Care

How can we look after our selves?

In Caring for Your Mental Health: About Self-Care the (United States) National Institute of Mental Health elaborate on:

“Self-care means taking the time to do things that help you live well and improve both your physical health and mental health. When it comes to your mental health, self-care can help you manage stress, lower your risk of illness, and increase your energy. Even small acts of self-care in your daily life can have a big impact.

Here are some tips to help you get started with self-care:

  • Get regular exercise. Just 30 minutes of walking every day can help boost your mood and improve your health. Small amounts of exercise add up, so don’t be discouraged if you can’t do 30 minutes at one time.
  • Eat healthy, regular meals and stay hydrated…
  • Make sleep a priority…
  • Try a relaxing activity…
  • Set goals and priorities…
  • Practice gratitude…
  • Focus on positivity…
  • Stay connected…”.

In Looking After Yourself: Emotional Wellbeing the JH explain:

World Mental Health Day 2023 and Menopause“There are many practical things you can do look after your emotional wellbeing.

For example:

  • Talk to someone you trust about your feelings (e.g. your friend, family member, doctor or psychologist
  • Keep a diary of your symptoms
  • Take time for yourself and do things you love doing
  • Get quality rest when you can
  • Do regular physical exercise, especially in a group or with friends
  • Practise relaxation techniques
  • Pay attention to your inner voice and practise using positive affirmations”.

Health Care Provider

What if I need help with my menopause mood?

In Looking After Yourself: Emotional Wellbeing – Talk To Your Doctor the JH also encourage us to seek health:

“If you are experiencing strong emotions, anxiety or depression, see your doctor.”

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Last Updated: 10 October 2023 – Last Revised: 10 October 2023

National Women’s Blood Pressure Awareness Week 2023 is October 15-21, in the United States. The only way to know if we have high blood pressure, is to have it measured.

National Women’s Blood Pressure Awareness Week

What is National Women’s Blood Pressure Awareness Week (NWBPAW)?

In National Women’s Blood Pressure Awareness Week the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS) Office on Women’s Health (OWH) elaborate on:

National Women’s Blood Pressure Awareness Week 2023“Heart disease is the number one cause of death for women in the United States. High blood pressure, or hypertension, is one of the major risk factors related to heart disease. Blood pressure is considered high if it measures at or above 130/80 mmHg. Many people with high blood pressure do not have any symptoms, so regularly checking blood pressure is important to make sure it is in a healthy range”.

Getting To the Heart of It All

What is NWBPAW 2023 theme?

In National Women’s Blood Pressure Awareness Week: NWBPAW 2023 Theme: Getting to the Heart of It All the HHS’s OWH explain:

National Women’s Blood Pressure Awareness Week 2023“A recent survey shows most women do not recognize that heart disease is their number one health threat. We know that many different factors contribute to blood pressure control and heart health.

The theme of NWBPAW 2023 – Getting to the Heart of It All – aims to bring awareness to the contributing factors that impact hypertension and heart health broadly”.

Silent Killer

Why can high blood pressure (HBP) be called the “silent killer”?

In Why High Blood High Pressure Is A “Silent Killer”: High Blood Pressure Is Often Called the “Silent Killer” the American Heart Association explain:

“Most of the time, high blood pressure (HBP, or hypertension) has no obvious symptoms to indicate that something is wrong. The best ways to protect yourself are being aware of the risks and making changes that matter”.

Women

Is there an association between women and HBP?

In High Blood Pressure and Women the (United States) Go Red for Women also note:

“A common misconception is that high blood pressure (HBP or hypertension) rarely affects women. However, nearly half of all adults with high blood pressure are women. In fact, women that are just 20 pounds or more overweight, have a family history of HBP or have reached menopause are known to increase a woman’s risk”.

Menopause

Is there an association between menopause and HBP?

In High Blood Pressure and Women: Heart Disease, High Blood Pressure and Menopause the Go Red for Women explain:

National Women’s Blood Pressure Awareness Week 2023“While you may have had normal blood pressure most of your life, your chances of developing high blood pressure increase considerably after menopause”.

Before and After Menopause

Before and after menopause, what may help control and prevent HBP?

In Menopause and High Blood Pressure: What’s the Connection? Is There A Connection Between Menopause and High Blood Pressure? the (United States) Mayo Clinic encourage women:

“To control your blood pressure both before and after menopause, focus on a healthy lifestyle:

  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • Eat heart-healthy foods. Choose whole grains, fruits and vegetables
  • Limit salt and processed foods
  • Exercise most days of the week
  • Manage stress
  • Limit or avoid alcohol
  • If you smoke, stop.

If necessary, your health care team may suggest medicines to help lower blood pressure”.

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Last Updated: 17 October 2023 – Last Revised: 08 October 2023

Menopause and high blood pressure is not something most of us think about. But, around menopause, our blood pressure can increase without us realizing. “Have your blood pressure checked at least once a year”.

Heart Disease

What is the association between heart disease and women?

In National Women’s Blood Pressure Awareness Week the (United States) Office of Women’s Health Womenshealth.gov note:

“Heart disease is the number one cause of death for women in the United States. High blood pressure, or hypertension, is one of the major risk factors related to heart disease. Blood pressure is considered high if it measures at or above 130/80 mmHg. Many people with high blood pressure do not have any symptoms, so regularly checking blood pressure is important to make sure it is in a healthy range”.

Menopause and High Blood Pressure

Women

What is the association between women and HBP?

In High Blood Pressure and Women the (United States) Go Red for Women note:

“A common misconception is that high blood pressure (HBP or hypertension) rarely affects women. However, nearly half of all adults with high blood pressure are women. In fact, women that are just 20 pounds or more overweight, have a family history of HBP or have reached menopause are known to increase a woman’s risk”.

Menopause and High Blood Pressure

Menopause

What is the association between menopause and HBP?

In High Blood Pressure and Women: Heart Disease, High Blood Pressure and Menopause the Go Red for Women explain:

“While you may have had normal blood pressure most of your life, your chances of developing high blood pressure increase considerably after menopause”.

Menopause and High Blood Pressure

Silent Killer

Why is high blood pressure often called the “silent killer”?

In Why High Blood High Pressure Is A “Silent Killer”: High Blood Pressure Is Often Called the “Silent Killer” the American Heart Association (AHA) explain:

“Most of the time, high blood pressure, or hypertension, has no obvious symptoms to indicate that something is wrong. The best ways to protect yourself are being aware of the risks and making changes that matter”.
Menopause and High Blood Pressure

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Last Updated: 15 October 2023 – Last Revised: 07 October 2023

Breast Cancer Awareness Month 2023 is held in October in many Countries. Schedule your routine mammogram and breast check today.

Breast Awareness

What is breast awareness?

In Breast Cancer: Breast Cancer Awareness – Breast Awareness, Cancer Australia elaborate on:

Breast Cancer Awareness Month 2023“Breast awareness is important for women of all ages, even if you’re having regular mammograms.

You don’t need to be an expert or use a special technique to check your breasts. Take the time to get to know the normal look and feel of your breasts as part of everyday activities like showering, dressing, putting on body lotion or simply looking in the mirror. Knowing what is normal for you will help you to detect any new breast or nipple changes”.

Breast Changes

What are some breast changes to look for?

In Breast Awareness: Know What To Look For, Breast Cancer Network Australia explain:

““I felt a lump,” is a common phrase for those who have had a breast cancer diagnosis, but there are many other symptoms or warning signs to watch for:

  • A new lump in your breast or underarm (armpit)
  • Thickening or swelling of part of your breast
  • Irritation or dimpling of your breast skin
  • Redness or flaky skin in your nipple area or your breast
  • Pulling in of your nipple or pain in your nipple area
  • Nipple discharge other than breast milk
  • Any change in the size or the shape of your breast
  • Pain in any area of your breast”.

Breast Cancer Screening

Where may women find information about breast cancer screening or early detection programs?

Women may find information about breast cancer screening or early detection programs from their health care provider or their country’s equivalent of a local community health center, national and/or state Department/Center/Institute of Aging/Cancer/Disease Control and Prevention/Health/Human Services.

Find free and low-cost breast and cervical cancer screenings in your area – National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection ProgramYour country may have a breast cancer early detection program similar to the CDC’s program. In National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP): Find A Screening Program Near You the (United States) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention elaborate on:

“CDC’s National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) provides breast and cervical cancer screenings and diagnostic services to women who have low incomes and are uninsured or underinsured”.

Alcohol and Breast Cancer Risk

What is the association between drinking alcohol and breast cancer risk?

In Drinking Alcohol the (United States) Breastcancer.org elaborate on:

“Research consistently shows that drinking alcoholic beverages — beer, wine, and liquor — increases a woman’s risk of hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer. Alcohol can increase levels of estrogen and other hormones associated with hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer. Alcohol also may increase breast cancer risk by damaging DNA in cells.

Compared to women who don’t drink at all, women who have three alcoholic drinks per week have a 15% higher risk of breast cancer. Experts estimate that the risk of breast cancer goes up another 10% for each additional drink women regularly have each day.”

Drink Less for Your BreastsBreast Cancer Awareness Month 2023

Do you want to drink less for your breasts?

Visit Drink Less for Your Breasts

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Last Updated: 03 October 2023 – Last Revised: 24 September 2023