“Before you consider calcium supplements, be sure you understand how much calcium you need, the pros and cons of calcium supplements, and which type of…”.1

Definition

What is calcium?

Depending on the Source (DotS) the definition of calcium may vary. The (United States) Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) definition is:

“Calcium is a mineral found in many foods”.2

Bones

What is the association between bones and calcium?

In Calcium: What Is Calcium and What Does It Do? the ODS explain:

“The body needs calcium to maintain strong bones and to carry out many important functions. Almost all calcium is stored in bones and teeth, where it supports their structure and hardness. The body also needs calcium for muscles to move and for nerves to carry messages between the brain and every body part. In addition, calcium is used to help blood vessels move blood throughout the body and to help release hormones and enzymes that affect almost every function in the human body”.3

In Calcium the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) elaborate on:

Calcium

“Calcium is important for preventing osteoporosis and bone disease, as it’s a major building-block of our bone tissue – our skeleton houses 99 % of our body’s calcium stores. The calcium in our bones also acts as a reservoir for maintaining calcium levels in the blood, which is essential for healthy nerves and muscles”.4

Calcium Bank

How do bones act like a calcium bank?

In Calcium: Calcium the Osteoporosis Australia explain:

“Bones act like a calcium bank, if you do not take in enough calcium from your diet, the body will withdraw calcium from your ‘bone bank’ for use in other parts of the body. If your body withdraws more calcium than it deposits, your bone density (bone strength) will gradually decline and you may be at risk of developing osteoporosis”.5

Foods

What foods provide calcium?

In Calcium: What Foods Provide Calcium? the ODS explain:

“Calcium is found in many foods. You can get recommended amounts of calcium by eating a variety of foods, including the following:

  • Milk, yogurt, and cheese are the main food sources of calcium for the majority of people in the United States
  • Kale, broccoli, and Chinese cabbage are fine vegetable sources of calcium
  • Fish with soft bones that you eat, such as canned sardines and salmon, are fine animal sources of calcium
  • Most grains (such as breads, pastas, and unfortified cereals), while not rich in calcium, add significant amounts of calcium to the diet because people eat them often or in large amounts
  • Calcium is added to some breakfast cereals, fruit juices, soy and rice beverages, and tofu. To find out whether these foods have calcium, check the product labels”.6

Foods Calcium Content

What is the calcium content of some foods?

Your country’s national Osteoporosis website may have a list of the calcium content of some foods similar to the IOF’s Calcium Content of Common Foods, the (United States) National Osteoporosis Foundation’s Calcium/Vitamin D: A Guide To Calcium-Rich Foods or Osteoporosis Australia’s The Calcium Content of Selected Foods.

Calcium Supplements

Before considering calcium supplements, what may it be important to understand?

In Nutrition and Healthy Eating: Calcium and Calcium Supplements – Achieving the Right Balance the (United States) Mayo Clinic elaborate on:

“Before you consider calcium supplements, be sure you understand how much calcium you need, the pros and cons of calcium supplements, and which type of supplement to choose”.7

Vitamin D

Is there an association between vitamin D and calcium?

The Mayo Clinic explain:

“To absorb calcium, your body also needs vitamin D. A few foods naturally contain small amounts of vitamin D, such as canned salmon with bones and egg yolks. You can also get vitamin D from fortified foods and sun exposure”.8

Health Care Provider

What if I would like to find out how much calcium and/or vitamin D I need daily?

If you would like to find out how much calcium and/or vitamin D you need daily, it may be in your best interest to choose to talk to your health care provider about this.

Health Topics A-Z

Where may I find Health Topics related to Calcium?

In Health Topics A-Z you may find:

Links

Where may I find Links related to Calcium?

Your Country may have Links similar to:

Sources

Where may I find the Sources quoted?

You may find the Sources quoted at:

Sources

  1. Nutrition and Healthy Eating: Calcium and Calcium Supplements – Achieving the Right Balance. 03 October 2018. Mayo Clinic https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/calcium-supplements/art-20047097 Accessed: 20 July 2020
  2. Calcium: What Is Calcium and What Does It Do? Updated: 06 December 2019. Office of Dietary Supplements https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Calcium-Consumer/ Accessed: 20 July 2020
  3. Calcium: What Is Calcium and What Does It Do? Updated: 06 December 2019. Office of Dietary Supplements https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Calcium-Consumer/ Accessed: 20 July 2020
  4. Calcium. International Osteoporosis Foundation https://www.iofbonehealth.org/calcium Accessed: 20 July 2020
  5. Calcium Calcium. Last Updated: 25 June 2019. Osteoporosis Australia https://www.osteoporosis.org.au/calcium Accessed: 20 July 2020
  6. Calcium: What Foods Provide Calcium? Updated: 06 December 2019. Office of Dietary Supplements https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Calcium-Consumer/ Accessed: 20 July 2020
  7. Nutrition and Healthy Eating: Calcium and Calcium Supplements – Achieving the Right Balance. 03 October 2018. Mayo Clinic https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/calcium-supplements/art-20047097 Accessed: 20 July 2020
  8. Nutrition and Healthy Eating: Calcium and Calcium Supplements – Achieving the Right Balance: Calcium and Diet. 03 October 2018. Mayo Clinic https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/calcium-supplements/art-20047097 Accessed: 20 July 2020
Topic Last Updated: 20 July 2020 – Topic Last Reviewed: 20 July 2020
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