“Blood pressure can increase after menopause, as can total cholesterol and LDL, or ‘bad cholesterol’. There can also be a decrease in HDL, or ‘good cholesterol’”.1

Umbrella
What may the Know Your Numbers Umbrella include?

Depending on the Source (DotS) this Umbrella may include:

  • Know Your Health Numbers
  • Know Your Numbers
  • Know Your Risks, Know Your Numbers

Numbers

What numbers do women (and men) need to know?

In Know Your Numbers? They Could Just Save Your Life: Start By Knowing Your Numbers the (United States) Go Red for Women elaborate on:

“Talk to your healthcare provider today to learn about your Blood Pressure, Cholesterol, Blood Sugar and BMI (Body Mass Index)”.

Your heart depends on it”.2

MenopauseKnow Your Numbers

What is the association between menopause and cardiovascular disease (heart disease and stroke)?

In Health After Menopause: Cardiovascular Disease the (Australian) Jean Hailes for Women’s Health note:

“Before menopause, women have a lower risk of heart disease than men, but as women age and their oestrogen levels fall after menopause, their risk of cardiovascular disease increases.

Blood pressure can increase after menopuase, as can total cholesterol and LDL, or ‘bad cholesterol’. There can also be a decrease in HDL, or ‘good cholesterol’. Other blood fats such as triglycerides can also increase”.3

Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes

Is there an association between prediabetes and type 2 diabetes and CVD?

In Know Your Health Numbers the American Heart Association (AHA) elaborate on:

“Individuals with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes are more likely to have high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, and, of course, high blood sugar. They are also likely to be overweight/obese. All of these factors increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and other serious health complications”.4

Protect Your Heart

How can women (and men) protect their hearts?

In Women and CVD – Facts and Tips: How To Protect Your Heart – Protect Your Heart: Know Your Numbers the World Heart Federation elaborate on:

“Have your blood pressure, cholesterol and glucose levels checked regularly. High blood pressure is the number one risk factor for stroke and a major factor for approximately half of all heart disease and stroke. High blood cholesterol and glucose levels can also place you at greater risk”.5

The Power of Knowing Your Numbers

What is The Power of Knowing Your Numbers?

In Know Your Numbers the (Australian) Jean Hailes for Women’s Health elaborate on:

“Knowing the numbers of key health measures can help you to know if you need to make some changes for the benefit of your current and future health”.6

Regular Checkups

Even if I feel fine, should I still see my health care provider for regular checkups?

Yes. In Health Screenings for Women Ages 40 To 64: Information the (United States) MedlinePlus note:

“Even if you feel fine, you should still see your provider for regular checkups. These visits can help you avoid problems in the future. For example, the only way to find out if you have high blood pressure is to have it checked regularly. High blood sugar and high cholesterol levels also may not have any symptoms in the early stages. A simple blood test can check for these conditions”.7

Health Care Provider

What if I would like to know my numbers?

If you would like to know your numbers, it may be in your best interest to choose to talk to your health care provider about this.

In Heart Disease Prevention: Know Your Heart Disease Numbers the Office on Women’s Health, United States Department of Health and Human Services, Womenshealth.gov note:

“Ask your doctor to check your blood pressure, cholesterol (total, HDL, LDL, and triglycerides) and blood sugar levels. Under the Affordable Care Act, most insurance plans must cover these tests at no cost to you. These tests will give you important information about your heart health. Your doctor can tell you what your numbers mean and what you need to do to protect your heart”.8

Health Topics A-Z

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In Health Topics A-Z you may find:

Links

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Sources

Where may I find the Sources quoted?

You may find the Sources quoted at:

Sources

  1. Health After Menopause: Cardiovascular Disease. Topic Updated: 22 October 2020 | Last Reviewed: 17 December 2017. Jean Hailes for Women’s Health https://jeanhailes.org.au/health-a-z/menopause/health-after-menopause Accessed: 19 November 2020
  2. Know Your Numbers? They Could Just Save Your Life. Go Red for Women https://www.goredforwomen.org/en/know-your-risk/know-your-numbers Accessed: 19 November 2020
  3. Health After Menopause: Cardiovascular Disease. Topic Updated: 22 October 2020 | Last Reviewed: 17 December 2017. Jean Hailes for Women’s Health https://jeanhailes.org.au/health-a-z/menopause/health-after-menopause Accessed: 19 November 2020
  4. Know Your Health Numbers. Last Reviewed August 2015. American Heart Association https://www.heart.org/en/health-topics/diabetes/prevention–treatment-of-diabetes/know-your-health-numbers Accessed: 19 November 2020
  5. Women and CVD – Facts and Tips: How To Protect Your Heart – Protect Your Heart: Know Your Numbers. 22 May 2017. World Heart Federation https://www.world-heart-federation.org/resources/women-cvd-facts-tips/ Accessed: 19 November 2020
  6. Know Your Numbers. Last Updated: 15 January 2020 | Last Reviewed 11 October 2018. Jean Hailes for Women’s Health https://jeanhailes.org.au/health-a-z/health-checks/know-your-numbers Accessed: 19 November 2020
  7. Health Screenings for Women Ages 40 To 64: Information. Review Date: 19 April 2020. Page Last Updated: 03 November 2020. MedlinePlus https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/007467.htm Accessed: 19 November 2020
  8. Heart Disease Prevention: Know Your Heart Disease Numbers. Medical Review In: 2015. Page Last Updated: 01 March 2019. Office on Women’s Health, United States Department of Health and Human Services, Womenshealth.gov https://www.womenshealth.gov/heart-disease-and-stroke/heart-disease/heart-disease-prevention Accessed: 19 November 2020

Topic Last Updated: 19 November 2020 – Topic Last Reviewed: 19 November 2020
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