“It is important to note that not all midlife women
experience mood problems, but some women
are more vulnerable than others to developing…”.1

Umbrella
What may the Depression and Women Umbrella include?

Depending on the Source (DotS) this Umbrella may include:

  • Black Dog
  • Clinical Depression
  • Depression
  • Depression the Serious Clinical Illness
  • Depressive Disorder/Episode/Illness
  • Dysthymia
  • Dysthymic Disorder
  • Major Depression
  • Major Depressive Disorder/Episode/Illness
  • Minor Depression
  • Nervous Breakdown
  • Persistent Depressive Disorder (PDD)
  • Unipolar Depression

Definition

What is depression?

DotS the definition of depression may vary. The World Health Organization’s (WHO) definition is:

“Depression is a common illness worldwide, with an estimated 3.8% of the population affected, including 5.0% among adults and 5.7% among adults older than 60 years. Approximately 280 million people in the word have depression. Depression is different from usual mood fluctuations and short-lived emotional responses to challenges in everyday life. Especially when recurrent and with moderate or severe intensity, depression may become a serious health condition. It can cause the affected person to suffer greatly and function poorly at work, at school and in the family”.2

Women

In women, how common is depression?

In Depression: Key Facts the WHO note:

  • “More women are affected by depression than men”.3

In Women the (Australian) Beyondblue elaborate on:

“While good mental health is essential to the overall health of both men and women, women experience some mental health conditions at higher rates than men.

In fact, around 1 in 6 women in Australia will experience depression and 1 in 3 women will experience anxiety during their lifetime. Women also experience post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and eating disorders at higher rates than men”.4

Symptoms

In women, what can be symptoms of depression?

In Depression In Women: 5 Things You Should Know – 3. Certain Types of Depression Are Unique To Women: Depression Affects Each Women Differently the NIMH explain:

“Not every woman who is depressed experiences every symptom. Some women experience only a few symptoms. Others have many. The severity and frequency of symptoms, and how long they last, will vary depending on the individual and the severity of the illness”.5

Anxiety

Is there an association between anxiety and depression?

In Depression: Depression and Anxiety Disorders: Not the Same the Anxiety and Depression Association of America elaborate on:

“Depression and anxiety disorders are different, but people with depression often experience symptoms similar to those of an anxiety disorder, such as nervousness, irritability, and problems sleeping and concentrating. But each disorder has its own causes and its own emotional and behavioral symptoms.

Many people who develop depression have a history of an anxiety disorder earlier in life. There is no evidence one disorder causes the other, but there is clear evidence that many people suffer from both disorders”.6

Perimenopause

Is there an association between perimenopause and depression?

In Depression In Women: 5 Things You Should Know – 3. Certain Types of Depression Are Unique To Women: Perimenopausal Depression the NIMH note:


Depression and Women
“Perimenopause (the transition into menopause) is a normal phase in a woman’s life that can sometimes be challenging. If you are going through perimenopause, you might be experiencing abnormal periods, problems sleeping, mood swings, and hot flashes. Although these symptoms are common, feeling depressed is not. If you are struggling with irritability, anxiety, sadness, or loss of enjoyment at the time of the menopause transition, you may be experiencing perimenopausal depression”.7

Menopause

Is there an association between menopause and depression?

On page one in Menopause and Depression: Depressive and Menopause Symptoms the NAMS elaborate on:

“It is important to note that not all midlife women experience mood problems, but some women are more vulnerable than others to developing either depressive symptoms or an episode of clinical depression during the menopause transition, especially those women who have had depression previously”.8

In Symptoms of Menopause: Mood & Emotional Health the (Australian) Jean Hailes for Women’s Health (JH) elaborate on:

“Research suggests that women are more likely to feel depressed during the menopause transition.

Women who have a history of depression or premenstrual syndrome (PMS) may be more likely to develop depression during this time”.9

Treatment

How can depression be treated?

In Depression: Treatment and Therapies the NIMH elaborate on:


Depression and Women
“Depression, even the most severe cases, can be treated. The earlier treatment begins, the more effective it is. Depression is usually treated with medications, psychotherapy, or a combination of the two. If these treatments do not reduce symptoms, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and other brain stimulation therapies may be options to explore”.10

In Depression: Treatment and Therapies the NIMH also include:

“Quick Tip: No two people are affected the same way by depression and there is no “one-size-fits-all” for treatment. It may take some trial and error to find the treatment that works best for you”.11

Online Resources, Programs, Apps and e-Therapies

Are depression online resources, programs, Apps and e-therapies available?

Depending on your Country, depression online resources, programs,  Apps and e-therapies may be available.

Your health care provider or local community health center may know of your Country’s recommended depression online resources, programs, Apps and e-therapies, similar to the (Australian) Department of Health’s Head To Health Search for Digital Mental Health Resources including thiswayup.org.au

Health Care Provider

What if I think I have depression?

If you think you have depression, it may be in your best interest to choose to talk to your health care provider about this urgently.

In Get Immediate Help the (United States) MentalHealth.gov note:

“People often don’t get the mental health services they need because they don’t know where to start.

Talk to your primary care doctor or another health professional about mental health problems. Ask them to connect you with the right mental health services”.12

In Depression In Women: 5 Things You Should Know – 1. Depression Is A Real Medical Condition: Most People With Depression Need Treatment To Feel Better the NIMH explain:

“If you think you may have depression, start by making an appointment to see your health care provider. This could be your primary doctor or a health provider who specializes in diagnosing and treating mental health conditions (for example, a psychologist or psychiatrist). Certain medications, and some medical conditions, such as viruses or a thyroid disorder, can cause the same symptoms as depression. A health care provider can rule out these possibilities by doing a physical exam, interview, and lab tests. Your health care provider will examine you and talk to you about treatment options and next steps”.13

In Find A Mental Health Professional: Finding the Right professional for You the (Australian) Beyondblue note:

“It’s important to find someone you feel comfortable with. While some people find a practitioner and treatment that works for them first time, for others it can take a few tries. The main thing is to persevere – try not to let one bad experience put you off getting support”.14

In Depression: How Health Professionals Can Help the JH remind us:

“Remember:

  • Depression is common
  • It is not a sign of weakness
  • It is nothing to be ashamed about
  • It can be treated”.15

Health Topics A-Z

Where may I find Health Topics related to Depression and Women?

In Health Topics A-Z you may find:

Links

Where may I find Links related to Depression and Women?

Your Country may have Links similar to:

Sources

Where may I find the Sources quoted?

You may find the Sources quoted at:

Sources

  1. Menopause and Depression: Depressive and Menopause Symptoms. 2018: 1. North American Menopause Society https://www.menopause.org/docs/default-source/default-document-library/menonote-menopause-and-depression.pdf Accessed: 04 December 2022
  2. Depression: Overview. 13 September 2021. World Health Organization https://www.who.int/en/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/depression Accessed: 04 December 2022
  3. Depression: Key Facts. 13 September 2021. World Health Organization https://www.who.int/en/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/depression Accessed: 04 December 2022
  4. Women. Beyondblue https://www.beyondblue.org.au/who-does-it-affect/women Accessed: 04 December 2022
  5. Depression In Women: 5 Things You Should Know – 3. Certain Types of Depression Are Unique To Women: Depression Affects Each Women Differently. Revised 2020. National Institute of Mental Health https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/depression-in-women/index.shtml#pub3 Accessed: 04 December 2022
  6. Depression. This Page was Updated: 10 November 2022. Anxiety and Depression Association of America https://www.adaa.org/understanding-anxiety/depression Accessed: 04 December 2022
  7. Depression In Women: 5 Things You Should Know – 3. Certain Types of Depression Are Unique To Women: Perimenopausal Depression. Revised 2020. National Institute of Mental Health https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/depression-in-women/index.shtml Accessed: 04 December 2022
  8. Menopause and Depression: Depressive and Menopause Symptoms. 2018: 1. North American Menopause Society https://www.menopause.org/docs/default-source/default-document-library/menonote-menopause-and-depression.pdf Accessed: 04 December 2022
  9. Symptoms of Menopause: Mood and Emotional Health. Last Updated: 12 September 2022 | Last Reviewed: 19 August 2022. Jean Hailes https://www.jeanhailes.org.au/health-a-z/menopause/menopause-symptoms#mood-and-emotional-healthAccessed: 04 December 2022
  10. Depression: Treatment and Therapies. Last Reviewed: September 2022. National Institute of Mental Health https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/depression/index.shtml#part_145399 Accessed: 04 December 2022
  11. Depression: Treatment and Therapies. Last Reviewed: September 2022. National Institute of Mental Health https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/depression/index.shtml#part_145399 Accessed: 04 December 2022
  12. Get Immediate Help. Last Updated: 06 September 2022. MentalHealth.gov https://www.mentalhealth.gov/get-help/immediate-help Accessed: 04 December 2022
  13. Depression In Women: 5 Things You Should Know – 1. Depression Is A Real Medical Condition: Most People With Depression Need Treatment To Feel Better. Revised 2020. National Institute of Mental Health https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/depression-in-women/index.shtml#pub1 Accessed: 04 December 2022
  14. Find A Mental Health Professional: Finding the Right professional for You. Beyondblue https://www.beyondblue.org.au/get-support/find-a-mental-health-professional Accessed: 04 December 2022
  15. Depression: How Health Professionals Can Help – Remember. Last Updated: 07 December 2020 | Last Reviewed: 10 March 2014. Jean Hailes https://jeanhailes.org.au/health-a-z/mental-emotional-health/depression Accessed: 04 December 2022
Topic Last Updated: 04 December 2022 – Topic Last Reviewed: 04 December 2022

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