“Menopause is your final menstrual period.
If you haven’t had a period for 12 months,
you’ve reached menopause”.1

Umbrella
What may the Menopause Umbrella include?

Depending on the Source (DotS) this Umbrella may include:

  • Change of Life
  • Early Menopause
  • Going Through the Menopause
  • Induced Menopause
  • Menopausal/Menopause Transition
  • Menopause
  • Natural Menopause
  • Perimenopause
  • Perimenopause, Menopause and Postmenopause
  • Postmenopause
  • Premature Menopause
  • Second Half of Your Life
  • Surgical Menopause
  • The Change
  • The Change of Life
  • The Time of Life
  • The Menopause Years
  • The Menopause-Related Years
  • The Three Stages of Menopause
  • Turning St Catherine’s Corner

Definition

What is menopause?

DotS the definition of menopause may vary. In Menopause: How Menopause Occurs the World Health Organization’s definition is:

“Natural menopause is deemed to have occurred after 12 consecutive months without menstruation for which there is no other obvious physiological or pathological cause and in the absence of clinical intervention”.2

In The 2023 Practitioner’s Toolkit for Managing Menopause: Definitions, published online 01 December 2023, the authors’ definition is:

“Menopause is the permanent cessation of menstruation in a non-hysterectomized woman. As many women may not be naturally menstruating when their menopause transition begins, for example due to hormonal contraception, having had an endometrial ablation or hysterectomy or pre-existing oligo-amenorrhea, a pragmatic definition of menopause is the permanent cessation of ovarian function”.3

On page four in Menopause Terminology: Glossary of Definitions – Menopause the definition used by the International Menopause Society is:

“Menopause – the last day of a woman’s last period ever”.4

In Menopause FAQs: An Introduction To Menopause – Q. What Is Menopause? the North American Menopause Society’s (NAMS) definition is:

“Menopause is a normal, natural event—defined as the final menstrual period and usually confirmed when a woman has missed her periods for 12 consecutive months (in the absence of other obvious causes)”.5

In What Is Menopause? Perimenopause, Menopause and Postmenopause: Menopause the (Australian) Jean Hailes for Women’s Health (JH) definition is:

“Menopause is your final menstrual period. If you haven’t had a period for 12 months, you’ve reached menopause”.6

Typical Age

What is the typical age at menopause?

In Optimising Health After Early Menopause: Summary, published 08 March 2024, the authors note:

“The typical age at menopause is 50–51 years in high-income countries. However, early menopause is common, with around 8% of women in high-income countries and 12% of women globally experiencing menopause between the ages of 40 years and 44 years. Menopause before age 40 years (premature ovarian insufficiency) affects an additional 2–4% of women.”.7

Different Differences

Do all women experience the same menopause?

No. Menopause is not one-size-fits-all. Although all women have a FMP, different women experience different symptoms, at different times, in different ways, for different lengths of time, before and after their FMP.

In Menopause: Diagnosis and Management – Information for the Public: Menopause – Symptoms the (British) National Institute for Health and Care Excellence’s (NICE) guideline, the NICE elaborate on:



“Menopause affects every woman differently. You may have no symptoms at all, or they might be brief and short lived. For some women they are severe and distressing.

You can still get menopause symptoms if you have had a hysterectomy (an operation to remove your womb).

Other natural changes as you age can be intensified by menopause. For example, you may lose some muscle strength and have a higher risk of conditions such as osteoporosis and heart disease”.8

Healthy Lifestyle

Can a healthy lifestyle improve menopause symptoms?

In the Joint Position Statement By the British Menopause Society, Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists and Society for Endocrinology on Best Practice Recommendations for the Care of Women Experiencing the Menopause, first published online 10 June 2022, one of the recommendations is:

  • “Women should be advised that implementing or maintaining a healthy lifestyle can improve menopause symptoms. A healthy diet (one low in saturated fat and salt and rich in calcium and vitamin D), stopping smoking, reducing alcohol intake and including regular exercise can be beneficial. Reducing caffeine intake may also improve symptoms”.9

Hormone Therapy

How effective is hormone therapy (HT) for the treatment of menopause symptoms?

On page one in Deciding About Hormone Therapy Use: Potential Benefits, published July 2022, the NAMS explain:

“Hormone therapy is one of the most effective treatments available for bothersome hot flashes and night sweats. If hot flashes and night sweats are disrupting your daily activities and sleep, HT may improve sleep and fatigue, mood, ability to concentrate, and overall quality of life. Treatment of bothersome hot flashes and night sweats is the principal reason women use HT. Hormone therapy also treats vaginal dryness and painful sex associated with menopause. Hormone therapy keeps your bones strong by preserving bone density and decreasing your risk of osteoporosis and fractures. If preserving bone density is your only concern, and you do not have bothersome hot flashes, other treatments may be recommended instead of HT”.10

Health Care Provider

What if I would like help with my menopause?

If you would like help with your menopause, it may be in your best interest to choose to talk to your health care provider about this.

In What Is Menopause? When To See Your Doctor the JH explain:

“Talk to your doctor if you are worried about:

  • Irregular periods
  • Heavy bleeding
  • Bleeding after menopause
  • Increased premenstrual syndrome (PMS) symptoms
  • Menopausal symptoms, such as hot flushes, that interfere with your daily life”.11

In Menopause: Diagnosis & Treatment – Treatment the (United States) Mayo Clinic encourage us to seek help:

“Before deciding on any form of treatment, talk with your doctor about your options and the risks and benefits involved with each. Review your options yearly, as your needs and treatment options may change”.12

Health Topics A-Z

Where may I find Health Topics A-Z related to Menopause?

In Health Topics A-Z you may find:

Links

Where may I find Links related to Menopause?

Your Country may have Links similar to:

Sources

Where may I find the Sources quoted?

You may find the Sources quoted at:

Sources

  1. What Is Menopause? Perimenopause, Menopause and Postmenopause: Menopause. Last Updated: 18 January 2024 | Last Reviewed: 19 August 2022. Jean Hailes for Women’s Health https://www.jeanhailes.org.au/health-a-z/menopause/about-menopause Accessed: 16 May 2024
  2. Menopause: How Menopause Occurs. 17 October 2022. World Health Organization https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/menopause Accessed: 16 May 2024
  3. Davis, S. R., Taylor, S., Hemachandra, C., Magraith, K., Ebeling, P. R., Jane, F., and Islam, R. M. The 2023 Practitioner’s Toolkit for Managing Menopause: Definitions. Published Online: 01 December 2023 https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13697137.2023.2258783 Accessed: 16 May 2024
  4. Menopause Terminology: Glossary of Definitions – Menopause. Page 4. International Menopause Society https://www.imsociety.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/10/IMS-English-Factsheet-4-glossary.pdf Accessed: 16 May 2024
  5. Menopause FAQs: An Introduction To Menopause – Q. What Is Menopause? North American Menopause Society https://www.menopause.org/for-women/menopause-faqs-an-introduction-to-menopause Accessed: 16 May 2024
  6. What Is Menopause? Perimenopause, Menopause and Postmenopause: Menopause. Last Updated: 18 January 2024 | Last Reviewed: 19 August 2022. Jean Hailes for Women’s Health https://www.jeanhailes.org.au/health-a-z/menopause/about-menopause Accessed: 16 May 2024
  7. Mishra, G. D., Davies, M. C., Hillman, S., Chung, H-F., Roy, S. and Hickey, M. Optimising Health After Early Menopause: Summary. Published: 05 March 2024. https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(23)02800-3/fulltext Accessed: 16 May 2024
  8. Menopause: Diagnosis and Management – Information for the Public: Menopause – Symptoms. Published Date: 12 November 2015. Last Updated: 05 December 2019. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng23/ifp/chapter/Menopause Accessed: 16 May 2024
  9. Hamoda, H, Mukherjee, A, Morris, E, Baldeweg, S. E., Jayasena, C. N., Briggs, P, Moger, S. Joint Position Statement By the British Menopause Society, Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists and Society for Endocrinology on Best Practice Recommendations for the Care of Women Experiencing the Menopause. First Published Online 10 June 2022:3-4. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/20533691221104879 Accessed: 16 May 2024
  10. Deciding About Hormone Therapy Use: Potential Benefits. 2022:1. North American Menopause Society https://www.menopause.org/docs/default-source/professional/menonote-deciding-about-ht-2022.pdf Accessed: 16 May 2024
  11. What Is Menopause? When To See Your Doctor. Last Updated: 18 January 2024 | Last Reviewed: 19 August 2022. Jean Hailes for Women’s Health https://www.jeanhailes.org.au/health-a-z/menopause/about-menopause Accessed: 16 May 2024
  12. Menopause: Diagnosis & Treatment – Treatment. 25 May 2023. Mayo Clinic https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/menopause/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20353401 Accessed: 16 May 2024
Topic Last Updated: 16 May 2024 – Topic Last Reviewed: 16 May 2024

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