“‘Early menopause’ is when the final menstrual period occurs between 40 and 45 years”. Some women share their stories about how early menopause affected them.

Early Menopause and Premature Menopause

Is early menopause the same as premature menopause?Early Menopause StoriesEarly Menopause Stories

In Later Years (Around 50 Years and Over): Menopause and Post Menopause Health – Early and Premature Menopause the (Scottish) NHS Inform explain:

“Menopause before the age of 45 is called early menopause. Menopause before the age of 40 is called premature menopause”.

Support After Early Menopause Your Stories

What is the (Australian) Jean Hailes for Women’s Health (JH) ‘Your Stories’?

In Support After Early Menopause Your Stories the (Australian) JH elaborate on:

“‘Your Stories’ is a place for women to share their health stories with us, to help support and encourage other women to make their health a priority too. Here is Natalie’s story.

Natalie, Melbourne, Victoria

Only hours after she was told she would have to undergo a hysterectomy and forego all hope of ever getting pregnant, Natalie headed off to her friend’s baby shower.

She and her husband had been trying for 18 months to have a baby. The endometriosis that Natalie had been trying to manage since her teens derailed their dream and the subsequent hysterectomy sent her into early menopause in her early 40s…”.

Early Menopause: Women’s Experiences

What is Early Menopause: Women’s Experiences?

In Early Menopause: Women’s Experiences – Overview, Healthtalk Australia elaborate on:

Early Menopause: Experiences and Perspectives of Women and Health Practitioners“On this unique site you can read, watch and listen to stories of 30 women aged between 28 and 51 years, from diverse socio-cultural backgrounds living in Victoria, Australia, who have shared what it is like to experience early menopause (EM).

Women talked about being diagnosed with spontaneous early menopause, premature ovarian insufficiency (POI), medically-induced early menopause, or menopausal symptoms as a result of cancer and/or other medical treatments”.

Early Menopause Video Stories

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Early Menopause Videos

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Health Care Provider

What if I think I have early menopause?

If you think you have early menopause, it may be in your best interest to choose to talk to your health care provider about this. Together you can discuss your options and if required, agree on who may be the most appropriate health care provider to help you.

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Last Updated: 24 May 2024 – Last Revised: 24 May 2024

Māori Women and Menopause includes the infographics Maori: Menopause What Are the Symptoms? and Maori: What Is Menopausal Hormone Therapy (MHT) and Is It Safe?

Maori: Menopause

Where may I find the Australasian Menopause Society’s (AMS) infographic Maori: Menopause What Are the Symptoms?

Your may find Maori: Menopause What Are the Symptoms? at:

Maori: Menopausal Hormone Therapy

Where may I find the AMS’s infographic Maori: What Is Menopausal Hormone Therapy (MHT) and Is It Safe?

Your may find Maori: What Is Menopausal Hormone Therapy (MHT) and Is It Safe? at:

NZ Doctors

Where may I find a list of New Zealand doctors “Who have a special interest in women’s health in midlife and menopause”?

Māori Women and MenopauseOn their website menopause.org.au in Find An AMS Doctor the AMS note:

  • “Who have a special interest in women’s health in midlife and menopause and the promotion of healthy ageing and
  • Have requested to be on this list”.

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Last Updated: 24 May 2024 – Last Revised: 24 May 2024

During perimenopause apart from mood changes such as anxiety, the menopause blues and mood swings, we may also experience changes in our PMS.

Meno Martha, PMS and PerimenopausePerimenopause Hormones

During perimenopause do our hormones declined in a regular fashion?

In Sexual Health & Menopause Online: Changes At Midlife – Changes In Hormone Levels: Estrogen the North American Menopause Society elaborate on:

“Estrogen levels generally decline during perimenopause, but they do so in an irregular fashion. Sometimes there can be more estrogen present during perimenopause than in the past”.

Perimenopause PMS

During perimenopause may our PMS symptoms get worse?

In Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS): Does PMS Change With Age? the Office on Women’s Health,  United States Department of Health and Human Services, Womenshealth.gov explain:

Meno Martha, PMS and Perimenopause“Yes. PMS symptoms may get worse as you reach your late 30s or 40s and approach menopause and are in the transition to menopause, called perimenopause.

This is especially true for women whose moods are sensitive to changing hormone levels during the menstrual cycle. In the years leading up to menopause, your hormone levels also go up and down in an unpredictable way as your body slowly transitions to menopause. You may get the same mood changes, or they may get worse.

PMS stops after menopause when you no longer get a period”.

In Premenstrual Disorders & Menopause: Perimenopause & Natural Menopause – How May Being Perimenopausal Affect My PMDD/PME? the International Association for Premenstrual Disorder’s (IAPMD) elaborate on:

“PMDD cycling does go away after you are fully menopausal; however, during the years before and during the menopause transition (perimenopause), things can get rough for a while since those with PMDD are sensitive to hormone changes, and hormone flux increases EVEN MORE during perimenopause. Estrogen and progesterone production becomes very erratic and unstable before it declines at menopause”.

Meno Martha, PMS and Perimenopause

Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS)

What is PMS?

Depending on the Source (DotS), the definition of PMS may vary. In PMDD/PMS: Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) the (United States) Massachusetts General Hospital) MGH Center for Women’s Mental Health’s definition is:

“Premenstrual Syndrome, commonly referred to as PMS, is a broad term that typically refers to a general pattern of physical, emotional and behavioral symptoms occurring 1-2 weeks before and remitting with the onset of menses. PMS is common, affecting from 30-80% of women of reproductive age, though clinically significant PMS symptoms have been reported in 3-8% of patients”.

Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD)

What is PMDD?

DotS, the definition of PMDD may vary. In PMDD/PMS: Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD) the MGH Center for Women’s Mental Health’s definition is:

“Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD) is a more severe form of Premenstrual Syndrome characterized by significant premenstrual mood disturbance, often with prominent mood reactivity and irritability. Symptoms of PMDD can emerge 1-2 weeks preceding menses and typically resolve with the onset of menses. This mood disturbance results in marked social or occupational impairment, with its most prominent effects in interpersonal functioning. In fact, a recent study found that women with untreated PMDD were likely to experience a loss of three quality-adjusted life years during their lifetime as a result of their premenstrual symptoms. This did not include menstruation-free periods, such as pregnancy, breastfeeding and menopause”.

How may PMDD be diagnosed?

In Tracking Your Cycle & Symptoms the IAPMD note:

PMDD cannot be diagnosed via blood, hormone, or saliva test. These tests can, however, rule out any underlying disorders including hormone imbalance or thyroid issues. The only way to currently test for PMDD is by tracking symptoms for a span of two more menstrual cycles”.

Monthly Diary

Meno Martha, PMS and PerimenopauseMay keeping a monthly diary help?

In Menstrual Diary the (United Kingdom) National Association for Premenstrual Syndrome explain:

“A completed menstrual chart is the first step towards understanding your own menstrual health. Download the menstrual diary.

Our chart helps you to record accurately your menstrual cycle, to note related symptoms as they occur, to define when you are symptom-free, to plot your days of menstruation and to note the duration of your cycle”.

In Premenstrual Syndrome – Self-Care: Keep A Diary of Symptoms the (United States) MedlinePlus explain:

“Keeping a calendar or diary of your symptoms can help you identify the symptoms that are causing you the most trouble. Writing down your symptoms on a calendar can help you understand possible triggers for your symptoms. It can also help your health care provider choose an approach that is most helpful for you. In your diary or calendar, be sure to record:

  • The type of symptoms you are having
  • How severe your symptoms are
  • How long your symptoms last
  • Whether your symptoms respond to a treatment you tried
  • At what point during your cycle your symptoms occur

You may need to try different things to treat PMS. Some things you try may work, and others may not. Keeping track of your symptoms may help you find the treatments that work best for you”.

Monthly Diary Format

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Health Care Provider

What if I would like help with PMS or PMDD or PME?

If you would like help with PMS or PMDD or PME (Premenstrual Exacerbation), it may be in your best interest to choose to talk to your health care provider about this.

In Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS): Living With – When Should I See My Healthcare Provider? the (United States) Cleveland Clinic explain:

“See your provider if you’re unable to get relief from your PMS symptoms. To get the most out of your visit, come to your appointment prepared to discuss your symptoms and your period in detail. Track your period and symptom history on a calendar, planner or app. Be prepared to share information about your period start and stop dates and your symptoms (including how mild or severe) for at least two consecutive periods”.

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Last Updated: 15 May 2024 – Last Revised: 15 May 2024

May 2024 Spotlights Mental Health. Mental Health Month is held in the United States in May and Mental Health Awareness Week is held 13-19 May in the United Kingdom.

Mental Health Month

What is the (United States) Mental Health Month?

In Mental Health Month the Mental Health America explain:

May 2024 Spotlights Mental Health“The world is constantly changing – for better or for worse – and it can be overwhelming to deal with everything going on around you. While society is getting more comfortable discussing mental health, it can still be hard to know “Where to Start” when it comes to taking care of your own well-being.

This May, Mental Health America will help you:

  • LEARN how modern life affects mental health with new resources to navigate our changing world.
  • ACT by building your coping toolbox so you can manage stress, difficult emotions, and challenging situations.
  • ADVOCATE to improve mental health for yourself, your friends and family, and your community.

For anyone struggling with the pressure of today’s world, feeling alone, or wondering if they can feel better, this is Where to Start”.

Mental Health Awareness Week

What is the (United Kingdom) Mental Health Awareness Week?

In Mental Health Awareness Week the [United Kingdom] Mental Health Foundation explain:

May 2024 Spotlights Mental Health“Focusing on anxiety for this year’s Mental Health Awareness Week will increase people’s awareness and understanding of anxiety by providing information on the things that can help prevent it from becoming a problem. At the same time, we will keep up the pressure to demand change – making sure that improving mental health is a key priority for the government and society as a whole”.

Menopause and Mental Health

Is there an association between menopause and mental health?

In Promoting Good Mental Health Over the Menopause Transition: Introduction – Key Messages published in the Lancet 25 March 2024, the authors include:

  • “…Risk factors for depressive symptoms at this time include severe and prolonged vasomotor symptoms, chronic sleep disturbance, and stressful life events, and women with previous depressive disorder might be at increased risk of recurrence of a new depressive episode during the menopause transition
  • The menopause transition often coincides with important life stressors, health conditions, and role transitions that increase vulnerability to depression…”.

Health Care Provider

What if I feel more out-of-sorts than usual?

If you feel more anxious, more depressed, more stressed or more out-of-sorts than usual, it may be in your best interest to choose to talk to your health care provider about this.

 May 2024 Spotlights Mental HealthIn Menopause and Mental Health: Untangling Physical and Mental Health Symptoms Related To Menopause the Australasian Menopause Society elaborate on:

“Speaking with your doctor about your menopausal symptoms, life circumstances and clinical history can help them to recommend the best treatment options and lifestyle and behavioural changes for your situation”.

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Last Updated: 21 May 2024 – Last Revised: 12 May 2024

World Ovarian Cancer Day 2024 is May 8. “Your risk increases as you get older. Ovarian cancer is more common in those aged 50-79”.

World Ovarian Cancer Day

What is World Ovarian Cancer Day?

In What Is World Ovarian Cancer Day? May 8 – World Ovarian Cancer Day: May 8 – World Ovarian Cancer Day the World Ovarian Cancer Coalition (WOCC) explain:

“Established in 2013 by a group of leaders from ovarian cancer advocacy organizations around the world, May 8 – World Ovarian Cancer Day, is the one day of the year we globally raise our voices in solidarity in the fight against ovarian cancer”.

World Ovarian Cancer Day 2024

Age

At what age does ovarian cancer typically occur?

In Ovarian Cancer Symptoms & Risks: What Are the Risk Factors for Ovarian Cancer? Age the WOCC note:

Age
Your risk increases as you get older. Ovarian cancer is more common in those aged 50-79. However, you can develop it when you are younger”.

Screening Test

Is there is a routine, simple screening test to accurately detect ovarian?

In Ovarian Cancer Testing & Detection the WOCC note:

“Currently, there is no routine, simple screening test to accurately detect ovarian cancer. Contrary to popular belief, cervical screening (i.e.: Pap smear) will not detect ovarian cancer. While cervical screening is effective in early detection of cervical cancer, it is not a test for ovarian cancer.

Because there is no routine ovarian cancer screening test, it is important to be aware of the disease and its symptoms”.

Symptoms

What are common symptoms of ovarian cancer?

In Ovarian Cancer Symptoms & Risks: What Are the Symptoms of Ovarian Cancer? the WOCC elaborate on:

“Common Signs & Symptoms of Ovarian Cancer include:

World Ovarian Cancer Day 2024

Occasionally, there can be other symptoms of ovarian cancer, such as:

  • Changes in bowel habits
  • Abnormal bleeding – Any post-menopausal bleeding should always be checked by your primary health care provider or doctor
  • Extreme fatigue
  • Unexplained weight loss”.

Symptom Diary

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What if I think I am experiencing symptoms of ovarian cancer?

In Ovarian Cancer Symptoms & Risks: What Are the Symptoms of Ovarian Cancer? the WOCC explain:

“If you have any concerns about ovarian cancer it is important to talk to your doctor or primary health care provider”.

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Last Updated: 09 May 2024 – Last Revised: 05 May 2024