Your Menopause, Your Heart showcases menopause, American Heart Month in February and Wear Red Day on Friday, February 2. After menopause, our risk of heart disease can increase…

Cardiovascular Disease

What is cardiovascular disease (CVD)?

Depending on the Source (DotS), the definition of CVD may vary. In What Is Cardiovascular Disease? the World Heart Federation’s (WHF) definition is:

“Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a class of diseases that affect the heart or blood vessels (veins and arteries)”.

Heart Disease

What is heart disease (CVD)?

DotS, the definition of heart disease may vary. In What Is Cardiovascular Disease? What are the Different Types of Cardiovascular Disease? Heart Disease the WHF’s definition is:

“Coronary heart disease, sometimes called coronary artery disease or ischemic heart disease, is the most common type of heart disease. It refers to heart problems caused by narrowed coronary arteries that supply blood to the heart muscle. For some people, the first sign of coronary heart disease is a heart attack”.

No 1 Killer of Women

Is CVD the No 1 killer of women?

According to the American Heart Association’s, Go Red for Women:

“Cardiovascular disease is the No. 1 killer of women”.

Breast Cancer

Your Menopause, Your HeartCan CVD kill more women than breast cancer?

In Women & CVD the WHF note:

“13x as many women die of CVD than of breast cancer”.

Menopause

What CVD risk factors should every woman know about?

In Menopause and Cardiovascular Disease: Does Menopause Increase A Woman’s Risk of Heart Disease and Stroke? the Go Red for Women elaborate on:

Your Menopause, Your Heart“Cardiovascular risk factors that every woman should know about include:

  • Age at the time of menopause. Women who reach menopause before age 45 have a significantly higher risk of coronary heart disease. Coronary heart disease results from plaque buildup in the arteries
  • Estrogen. Levels of estrogen, which helps keep blood vessels relaxed and open, start to decline markedly as menopause approaches. With less estrogen, cholesterol may begin to build up on artery walls. A buildup in vessels leading to the heart or brain can increase the risk of heart disease or stroke.
  • Hot flashes and night sweats. Hot flashes and night sweats are the most common menopause-related symptoms and can last up to 10 years. They also are associated with worse cardiovascular disease risk factor levels.
  • Depression and sleep problems. In some studies, depression and sleep disturbances were linked to an increased risk of heart disease.
  • Increased visceral fat
  • Cholesterol levels and metabolic syndrome risk

Know Your Numbers

Your Menopause, Your HeartWhat numbers do women (and men) we need to know?

In Know Your Numbers They Could Just Save Your Life the Go Red for Women explain:

“You can’t manage what you don’t measure, which is why knowing your risk is critical to preventing cardiovascular disease. And knowing your risk starts with knowing your numbers.

Talk to your healthcare provider today to learn about your Blood Pressure, Cholesterol, Blood Sugar and BMI (Body Mass Index). Your heart depends on it”.

Health Topics A-Z

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Last Updated: 14 February 2024 – Last Revised 28 January 2024

Māori Women and Menopause includes the infographics Maori: Menopause What Are the Symptoms? and Maori: What Is Menopausal Hormone Therapy (MHT) and Is It Safe?

Maori: Menopause

Where may I find the Australasian Menopause Society’s (AMS) infographic Maori: Menopause What Are the Symptoms?

Your may find Maori: Menopause What Are the Symptoms? at:

Maori: Menopausal Hormone Therapy

Where may I find the AMS’s infographic Maori: What Is Menopausal Hormone Therapy (MHT) and Is It Safe?

Your may find Maori: What Is Menopausal Hormone Therapy (MHT) and Is It Safe? at:

NZ Doctors

Where may I find a list of New Zealand doctors “Who have a special interest in women’s health in midlife and menopause”?

Māori Women and MenopauseOn their website menopause.org.au in Find An AMS Doctor the AMS note:

  • “Who have a special interest in women’s health in midlife and menopause and the promotion of healthy ageing and
  • Have requested to be on this list”.

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Last Updated: 15 February 2024 – Last Revised: 12 January 2024

“‘Early menopause’ is when the final menstrual period occurs between 40 and 45 years”. Some women share their stories about how early menopause affected them.

Early Menopause and Premature Menopause

Is early menopause the same as premature menopause?Early Menopause StoriesEarly Menopause Stories

In Later Years (Around 50 Years and Over): Menopause and Post Menopause Health – Early and Premature Menopause the (Scottish) NHS Inform explain:

“Menopause before the age of 45 is called early menopause. Menopause before the age of 40 is called premature menopause”.

Support After Early Menopause Your Stories

What is the (Australian) Jean Hailes for Women’s Health (JH) ‘Your Stories’?

In Support After Early Menopause Your Stories the (Australian) JH elaborate on:

“‘Your Stories’ is a place for women to share their health stories with us, to help support and encourage other women to make their health a priority too. Here is Natalie’s story.

Natalie, Melbourne, Victoria

Only hours after she was told she would have to undergo a hysterectomy and forego all hope of ever getting pregnant, Natalie headed off to her friend’s baby shower.

She and her husband had been trying for 18 months to have a baby. The endometriosis that Natalie had been trying to manage since her teens derailed their dream and the subsequent hysterectomy sent her into early menopause in her early 40s…”.

Early Menopause: Women’s Experiences

What is Early Menopause: Women’s Experiences?

In Early Menopause: Women’s Experiences – Overview, Healthtalk Australia elaborate on:

Early Menopause: Experiences and Perspectives of Women and Health Practitioners“On this unique site you can read, watch and listen to stories of 30 women aged between 28 and 51 years, from diverse socio-cultural backgrounds living in Victoria, Australia, who have shared what it is like to experience early menopause (EM).

Women talked about being diagnosed with spontaneous early menopause, premature ovarian insufficiency (POI), medically-induced early menopause, or menopausal symptoms as a result of cancer and/or other medical treatments”.

Early Menopause Video Stories

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Health Care Provider

What if I think I have early menopause?

If you think you have early menopause, it may be in your best interest to choose to talk to your health care provider about this. Together you can discuss your options and if required, agree on who may be the most appropriate health care provider to help you.

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Last Updated: 06 January 2024 – Last Revised: 06 January 2024

Endometriosis after menopause, usually does improve. However, “5% of endometriosis patients are postmenopausal”.

Endometriosis

What is endometriosis?

In Facts About Endometriosis the World Endometriosis Society’s definition is:

“Endometriosis is a condition in which tissue similar to the lining inside the uterus (called “the endometrium”), is found outside the uterus, where it induces a chronic inflammatory reaction that may result in scar tissue. It is primarily found on the pelvic peritoneum, on the ovaries, in the recto-vaginal septum, on the bladder, and bowel”.

Endometriosis After Menopause

Does endometriosis go away after menopause?

In Endometriosis Toolkit: A Patient Empowerment Guide the (United States) Society for Women’s Health Research note in Endometriosis and Menopause:

“5% of endometriosis patients are postmenopausal”.

Endometriosis After Menopause

Health Care ProviderEndometriosis After Menopause

What if I think I am having symptoms of endometriosis after menopause?

In Endometriosis: Does Endometriosis Go Away After Menopause? the Office on Women’s Health, United States Department of Health and Human Services, Womenshealth.gov note:

“For some women, the painful symptoms of endometriosis improve after menopause. As the body stops making the hormone estrogen, the growths shrink slowly. However, some women who take menopausal hormone therapy may still have symptoms of endometriosis.

If you are having symptoms of endometriosis after menopause, talk to your doctor about treatment options”.

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Last Updated: 03 January 2024 – Last Revised: 03 January 2024