“Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is a talking therapy that can help you manage your problems by changing the way you think and behave”.1

Umbrella
What may the Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Umbrella include?

Depending on the Source (DotS) this Umbrella may include:

  • Cognitive Behavioral/Behavioural Therapy (CBT)
  • Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT)
  • Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR)

Definition

What is cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT)?

DotS the definition of CBT may vary. The (United Kingdom) NHS’s (National Health Service) definition is:

“Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is a talking therapy that can help you manage your problems by changing the way you think and behave. It’s most commonly used to treat anxiety and depression, but can be useful for other mental and physical health problems”.2

The (United States) National Alliance on Mental Illness’ (NAMI) definition is:

“Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) focuses on exploring relationships among a person’s thoughts, feelings and behaviors. During CBT a therapist will actively work with a person to uncover unhealthy patterns of thought and how they may be causing self-destructive behaviors and beliefs”.3

The (United States) Mayo Clinic’s definition is:

“Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a common type of talk therapy (psychotherapy). You work with a mental health counselor (psychotherapist or therapist) in a structured way, attending a limited number of sessions. CBT helps you become aware of inaccurate or negative thinking so you can view challenging situations more clearly and respond to them in a more effective way”.4

Treatment

What may CBT be used to treat?

In Psychotherapy: Popular Types of Psychotherapy – Cognitive Behavioral Therapy the NAMI:

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy

“Studies of CBT have shown it to be an effective treatment for a wide variety of mental illnesses, including depression, anxiety disorders, bipolar disorder, eating disorders and schizophrenia. Individuals who undergo CBT show changes in brain activity, suggesting that this therapy actually improves your brain functioning as well”.5

In Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT): Overview – Uses for CBT the NHS elaborate on:

“In addition to depression or anxiety disorders, CBT can also help people with:

  • Bipolar Disorder
  • Borderline Personality Disorder
  • Eating Disorders – such as anorexia and bulimia…
  • Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)…
  • Panic Disorder…
  • Phobias…
  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)…
  • Psychosis
  • Schizophrenia
  • Sleep Problems – such as insomnia…
  • Problems related to alcohol misuse…
CBT is also sometimes used to treat people with long-term health conditions, such as:

  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)
  • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS)
  • Fibromyalgia
Although CBT cannot cure the physical symptoms of these conditions, it can help people cope better with their symptoms”.6

How

How does CBT work?

In Psychotherapy: Popular Types of Psychotherapy – Cognitive Behavioral Therapy the NAMI:

“The core principles of CBT are identifying negative or false beliefs and testing or restructuring them. Oftentimes someone being treated with CBT will have homework in between sessions where they practice replacing negative thoughts with with more realistic thoughts based on prior experiences or record their negative thoughts in a journal”.7

In Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT): Overview – How CBT Works the NHS elaborate on:

“CBT aims to help you deal with overwhelming problems in a more positive way by breaking them down into smaller parts. You’re shown how to change these negative patterns to improve the way you feel”.8

Different Differences

How is CBT different from some other talking treatments?

The NHS explain:

“Unlike some other talking treatments, CBT deals with your current problems, rather than focusing on issues from your past. It looks for practical ways to improve your state of mind on a daily basis”.9

Online eTherapy

Is CBT online eTherapy available?

DotC (Depending on the Country), CBT online eTherapy may be available. Your health care provider or local community health center may know of your Country’s recommended online CBT eTherapy programs.

Or your Country’s mental health websites may provided links to your Country’s recommended online CBT eTherapy programs.

Health Care Provider

What if I think I could benefit from CBT?

If you would think you could benefit from CBT, it may be in your best interest to choose to talk to your health care provider about this. Together you can discuss your options and if required, agree on who may be the most appropriate health care provider to help you.

In Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: Overview the Mayo Clinic elaborate on:

“CBT can be a very helpful tool ― either alone or in combination with other therapies ― in treating mental health disorders, such as depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or an eating disorder. But not everyone who benefits from CBT has a mental health condition. CBT can be an effective tool to help anyone learn how to better manage stressful life situations”.10

Health Topics A-Z

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In Health Topics A-Z you may find:

Links

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Sources

Where may I find the Sources quoted?

You may find the Sources quoted at:

Sources

  1. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT): Overview. Page Last Reviewed: 16 July 2019. NHS (National Health Service) https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/cognitive-behavioural-therapy-cbt/ Accessed: 15 May 2020
  2. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT): Overview. Page Last Reviewed: 16 July 2019. NHS (National Health Service) https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/cognitive-behavioural-therapy-cbt/ Accessed: 15 May 2020
  3. Psychotherapy: Popular Types of Psychotherapy – Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. National Alliance on Mental Illness https://www.nami.org/Learn-More/Treatment/Psychotherapy Accessed: 15 May 2020
  4. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: Overview. 16 March 2019. Mayo Clinic https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/cognitive-behavioral-therapy/about/pac-20384610 Accessed: 15 May 2020
  5. Psychotherapy: Popular Types of Psychotherapy – Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. National Alliance on Mental Illness https://www.nami.org/Learn-More/Treatment/Psychotherapy Accessed: 15 May 2020
  6. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT): Overview – Uses for CBT. Page Last Reviewed: 16 July 2019. NHS (National Health Service) https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/cognitive-behavioural-therapy-cbt/#uses-for-cbt Accessed: 15 May 2020
  7. Psychotherapy: Popular Types of Psychotherapy – Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. National Alliance on Mental Illness https://www.nami.org/Learn-More/Treatment/Psychotherapy Accessed: 15 May 2020
  8. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT): Overview – How CBT Works. Page Last Reviewed: 16 July 2019. NHS (National Health Service) https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/cognitive-behavioural-therapy-cbt/#how-cbt-works Accessed: 15 May 2020
  9. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT): Overview – How CBT Works. Page Last Reviewed: 16 July 2019. NHS (National Health Service) https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/cognitive-behavioural-therapy-cbt/#how-cbt-works Accessed: 15 May 2020
  10. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: Overview. 16 March 2019. Mayo Clinic https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/cognitive-behavioral-therapy/about/pac-20384610 Accessed: 15 May 2020
Topic Last Updated: 15 May 2020 – Topic Last Reviewed: 15 May 2020
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