“While not a problem for everyone transitioning
through menopause the risk of mood changes and
/symptoms of depression and anxiety are higher…”.1

Umbrella
What may the Menopause Blues Umbrella include?

Depending on the Source (DotS) this Umbrella may include:

  • Blue Moods
  • Depressed Mood
  • Dysphoria
  • Feeling Blue
  • Feeling Sad
  • “Menopause Blues”
  • “The Blues”

Menopause

Is there an association between menopause and the menopause blues?

In Menopause and Mental Health, content updated February 2023, the Australasian Menopause Society (AMS) explain:

“While not a problem for everyone transitioning through menopause, the risk of mood changes and /symptoms of depression and anxiety are higher during perimenopause, even in women without a history of major depression.

While the risk is higher for women in the age-related and natural menopausal transition, women might also have a higher risk of mood changes after menopause caused by surgery such as hysterectomy or if the ovaries have been removed. Depression also occurs at a higher rate in women with a lack of oestrogen caused by primary ovarian insufficiency”.2

Menopause Mood Changes

What menopause mood changes may we experienced?

In Symptoms of Menopause: Mood and Emotional Health, last updated 08 June 2023, the (Australian) Jean Hailes for Women’s Health (JH) elaborate on:

Menopause Blues“You may notice that menopause causes your mood to change. This is due to changing hormone levels. You might experience:

  • Irritability
  • Increased anger
  • Low mood
  • Depression and anxiety”

Research suggests that women are more likely to feel depressed during the menopause transition.

Women who have a history of depression or premenstrual syndrome (PMS) may be more likely to develop depression during this time”.3

Depression

Does menopause cause depression?

According to the AMS:

“Depression is not more common at menopause than at other stages of life, but a past history of depression, particularly post-natal depression, and stress during the peri-menopause may make a woman more likely to succumb to mood problems”.4

In Symptoms of Menopause: Mood and Emotional Health the JH note:

“Research suggests that women are more likely to feel depressed during the menopause transition.

Women who have a history of depression or premenstrual syndrome (PMS) may be more likely to develop depression during this time”.5

On page one and two in Emotional Wellness In Menopause: What About Depression?, published date June 2023, the (British) Women’s Health Concern (WHC) elaborate on:

“Mood changes that can accompany menopause are distressing and need to be taken seriously. However, they are different from clinical depression where mood is very low and persistent. Menopause does increase a woman’s risk of developing depression, and if emotional and cognitive symptoms of menopause are ignored, they can develop into more serious depression. Don’t ignore how you feel and if you, or someone close to you, are suffering from depression please do speak to a healthcare professional. There is no shame seeking help”.6

Contributing Factors

What may be contributing factors to feeling depressed?

In Menopause and Mental Health: Mental Health Symptoms Related To Menopause, content updated February 2023, according to the AMS:

“While many women do not have mental health issues during the menopausal transition, unstable oestrogen levels can have an impact on the brain, predisposing some women to feelings of depression and anxiety.

Some of the common physical, memory and thinking symptoms related to menopause (hot flushes, night sweats, sleep and sexual disturbances, weight changes and “brain fog”) can complicate and overlap with mental health symptoms.

Another complicating factor is stress related to life circumstances. Feeling stress is common during middle age as personal and environmental changes take place. This can have a strong effect on mood in some women…”.7

Self Care

How can we look after our selves?

In Caring for Your Mental Health: About Self-Care the (United States) National Institute of Mental Health elaborate on:

“Self-care means taking the time to do things that help you live well and improve both your physical health and mental health. When it comes to your mental health, self-care can help you manage stress, lower your risk of illness, and increase your energy. Even small acts of self-care in your daily life can have a big impact.

Here are some tips to help you get started with self-care:

  • Get regular exercise. Just 30 minutes of walking every day can help boost your mood and improve your health. Small amounts of exercise add up, so don’t be discouraged if you can’t do 30 minutes at one time.
  • Eat healthy, regular meals and stay hydrated…
  • Make sleep a priority…
  • Try a relaxing activity…
  • Set goals and priorities…
  • Practice gratitude…
  • Focus on positivity…
  • Stay connected…”.8

In Looking After Yourself: Emotional Wellbeing the JH explain:

World Mental Health Day 2022 and Menopause“There are many practical things you can do look after your emotional wellbeing.

For example:

  • Talk to someone you trust about your feelings (e.g. your friend, family member, doctor or psychologist
  • Keep a diary of your symptoms
  • Take time for yourself and do things you love doing
  • Get quality rest when you can
  • Do regular physical exercise, especially in a group or with friends
  • Practise relaxation techniques
  • Pay attention to your inner voice and practise using positive affirmations”.9

Online Resources, Programs, Apps and e-therapies

Are mental health online resources, programs, Apps and e-therapies available?

Depending on your Country, mental health online resources, programs,  Apps and e-therapies may be available.

Your health care provider or local community health center may know of your Country’s recommended mental health online resources, programs, Apps and e-therapies, similar to the (Australian) Department of Health’s thiswayup.org.au

Treatments

What treatments are available?

On page one in Emotional Wellness In Menopause: What Treatments Are Available? the WHC elaborate on:

“There is no one size fits all for women when it comes to managing physical or psychological symptoms of menopause, but a variety of treatments are available.

  • Anti-depressants can help with emotional and cognitive symptoms of the menopause. However, unless you have been diagnosed with depression, there are other treatments which may be more helpful and appropriate
  • Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) can help with many cognitive and emotional symptoms of menopause. HRT can also help improve quality of sleep. It’s useful to keep a record of symptoms to discuss with your HRT prescriber as this will help identify the best HRT regime for you
  • Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) and other talking therapies can be hugely beneficial in dealing with some of the emotional symptoms of menopause. Even women who have never used therapies before and them helpful to navigate their menopause journey
  • Mindfulness and meditation are popular techniques to help relax and clear the mind – a very useful addition to managing some of the emotional and cognitive symptoms of menopause. Alongside restorative exercise such as yoga and Pilates, both body and mind can recover and heal”.10

Menopausal Hormone Therapy

May menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) be beneficial in improving mood?

In Mood and the Menopause: Management the AMS note:

“Menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) may help women who have symptoms of low mood related to perimenopause or menopause. However, MHT is not currently recommended as a first line treatment for major depression. MHT may be of particular benefit for mood and sleep quality in women experiencing VMS and can be considered in combination with antidepressants. Evidence from RCTs suggests oestrogen is as effective as antidepressants in perimenopausal women but is ineffective in post-menopausal women suggesting a window of opportunity for its use in the perimenopause”.11

What is VMS?

VMS can be an abbreviation for Vasomotor Symptoms.

What is RCTs?

RCTs can be an abbreviation for Randomised Control Trials.

Health Care Provider

What if I would like help with my menopause blues?

If you would like help with your menopause blues, it may be in your best interest to choose to talk to your health care provider about this.

In Looking After Yourself: Emotional Wellbeing – Talk To Your Doctor the JH encourage us to seek help:

“If you are experiencing strong emotions, anxiety or depression, see your doctor”.12

In Depression: How Health Professionals Can Help – Remember the JH also remind us:

  • “Depression is common
  • It is not a sign of weakness
  • It is nothing to be ashamed about
  • It can be treated”.13

Health Topics A-Z

Where may I find Health Topics A-Z related to Menopause Blues?

In Health Topics A-Z you may find:

Links

Where may I find Links related to Menopause Blues?

Your Country may have Links similar to:

Sources

Where may I find the Sources quoted?

You may find the Sources quoted at:

Sources

  1. Menopause and Mental Health. Content Updated February 2023. Australasian Menopause Society https://www.menopause.org.au/health-info/fact-sheets/menopause-and-mental-health Accessed: 19 September 2023
  2. Menopause and Mental Health. Content Updated February 2023. Australasian Menopause Society https://www.menopause.org.au/health-info/fact-sheets/menopause-and-mental-health Accessed: 19 September 2023
  3. What Is Menopause? Psychological Symptoms of Menopause. Content Created: May 2022. Australasian Menopause Society https://www.menopause.org.au/hp/information-sheets/185-what-is-menopause Accessed: 19 September 2023
  4. Menopause and Mental Health. Content Updated February 2023. Australasian Menopause Society https://www.menopause.org.au/health-info/fact-sheets/menopause-and-mental-health Accessed: 19 September 2023
  5. Symptoms of Menopause: Menopause & Mood. Last Updated: 04 September 2023 | Last Reviewed: 19 August 2022. Jean Hailes for Women’s Health https://www.jeanhailes.org.au/health-a-z/menopause/menopause-symptoms Accessed: 19 September 2023
  6. Emotional Wellness In Menopause: What About Depression? Published Dated: June 2023:1-2. Women’s Health Concern https://www.womens-health-concern.org/help-and-advice/menopause-wellness-hub/ Accessed: 19 September 2023
  7. Menopause and Mental Health. Content Updated February 2023. Australasian Menopause Society https://www.menopause.org.au/health-info/fact-sheets/menopause-and-mental-health Accessed: 19 September 2023
  8. Caring for Your Mental Health: About Self-Care. Last Reviewed: December 2022. National Institute of Mental Health https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/caring-for-your-mental-health Accessed: 19 September 2023
  9. Looking After Yourself: Emotional Wellbeing. Last Updated: 04 September 2023 | Last Reviewed: 19 August 2022. Jean Hailes for Women’s Health https://www.jeanhailes.org.au/health-a-z/menopause/mental-health-emotions Accessed: 19 September 2023
  10. Emotional Wellness In Menopause: What Treatments Are Available? Published Dated: June 2023:1. Women’s Health Concern https://www.womens-health-concern.org/help-and-advice/menopause-wellness-hub/ Accessed: 19 September 2023
  11. Mood and the Menopause: Management. Content Updated February 2023. Australasian Menopause Society https://www.menopause.org.au/hp/information-sheets/mood-and-the-menopause Accessed: 19 September 2023
  12. Looking After Yourself: Emotional Wellbeing – Talk To Your Doctor. Last Updated: 04 September 2023 | Last Reviewed: 19 August 2022. Jean Hailes for Women’s Health https://www.jeanhailes.org.au/health-a-z/menopause/mental-health-emotions Accessed: 19 September 2023
  13. Depression: How Health Professionals Can Help – Remember. Last Updated: 26 August 2023 | Last Reviewed: 10 March 2014. Jean Hailes for Women’s Health https://jeanhailes.org.au/health-a-z/mental-emotional-health/depression Accessed: 19 September 2023
Topic Last Updated: 19 September 2023 – Topic Last Reviewed: 19 September 2023

Print Friendly, PDF & Email