“In studies, mood changes have been observed in up to 23% of peri- and postmenopausal women. Additionally, symptoms of anxiety—tension, nervousness…”.1

Umbrella
What may the Menopause Mood Changes Umbrella include?

Depending on the Source (DotS) this Umbrella may include:

  • Menopause Mood Changes
  • Menopause Moodiness
  • Menopause Moods

Terminology

Can menopause mood changes mean different things to different people?

I think the term menopause mood changes can be like the terms anxiety, exercise and love and mean different things, to different people, at different times, in different places.

When I use the term menopause mood changes what I mean may be different to what someone else means or what is meant in medicaltalk.

It can therefore be important when the term menopause mood changes is used to be clear about what is meant, so we may work out whether we are on the same page meaning the same thing or not.

Mood Changes

Is there an association between menopause and mood changes?

In Menopause FAQs: Menopause Symptoms: Q. My family tells me that I’ve become moody, and I admit that I sometimes feel blue or short-tempered. Menopause? the North American Menopause Society (NAMS) elaborate on:

Menopause Mood Changes“A. Most women make the transition into menopause without experiencing depression, but many women report symptoms of moodiness, depressed mood, anxiety, stress, and a decreased sense of well-being during perimenopause. Women with a history of clinical depression or a history of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) or postpartum depression seem to be particularly vulnerable to recurrent depression during perimenopause, as are women who report significant stress, sexual dysfunction, physical inactivity, or hot flashes”.2

According to the Australasian Menopause Society:

“Depression is not more common at menopause than at other stages of life, but a past history of depression, particularly post-natal depression, and stress during the peri-menopause may make a woman more likely to succumb to mood problems”.3

The (Australian) Jean Hailes for Women’s Health note:

“Women can feel depressed and/or experience changes in their mood around perimenopause (the months/years before menopause) when their hormone levels fluctuate. Menopause does not cause depression, but women who have had depression before menopause, or who have a history of premenstrual syndrome (PMS), may be more sensitive to the hormonal changes that menopause brings”.4

In Mental Health & Emotions: Depression, Anxiety & Menopause the JH also acknowledge:

“In turn, the symptoms of menopause, such as hot flushes and night sweats, can affect mood and make some women feel depressed. Many women kept awake at night because of night sweats find they are exhausted, can’t think clearly and feel more negative because they have had poor quality sleep”.5

Cause

What may cause menopause mood changes?

The NAMS explain:

Menopause Mood Changes“It has been suggested that mood symptoms may be related to erratic fluctuations in estrogen levels, but limited data exist on why this occurs”.6

Common or Not

How common are menopause mood changes?

The NAMS note:

“In studies, mood changes have been observed in up to 23% of peri- and postmenopausal women. Additionally, symptoms of anxiety—tension, nervousness, panic, and worry—are reported more frequently during perimenopause than before it, regardless of whether symptoms of depression are present or not”.7

Self-Help Measures

What are some self-help measures which may help mood changes?

In Menopause: Treatment – Mood Changes the (United Kingdom) NHS (National Health Service) elaborate on:

“Some women experience mood swings, low mood and anxiety around the time of the menopause. Self-help measures such as getting plenty of rest, taking regular exercise and doing relaxing activities such as yoga and tai chi may help. Medication and other treatments are also available, including HRT and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT)”.8

Physical Activity

Is there an association between physical activity and mood?

In 5 Things You Should Know About Stress: 4. There Are Ways To Manage Stress the (United States) National Institute of Mental Health note:

“Get Regular Exercise. Just 30 minutes per day of walking can help boost your mood and reduce stress”.9

Menopausal Hormone Therapy

May menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) be beneficial in improving mood?

One of the points of consensus in the Revised Global Consensus Statement on Menopausal Hormone Therapy: Section A: Benefit/Risk Profile of MHT – endorsed by seven menopause-related organizations – published online 20 June 2016 is:

  • “MHT may be beneficial in improving mood in early postmenopausal women with depressive and/or anxiety symptoms. MHT may also be beneficial for perimenopausal women with major depression but antidepressant therapy remains first-line treatment in this setting”.10

Health Care Provider

What if my mood changes are making me moodier?

If your mood changes are making you moodier, it may be in your best interest to choose to talk to your health care provider about this. In Going Mad In Perimenopause? Signs and Solutions: Seek Support the NAMS note:

“Don’t try to diagnose and treat yourself; you shouldn’t feel embarrassed about reaching out for help. By evaluating symptoms as well as personal and family history, the appropriate health professional can provide expert relief recommendations. Remember, medication for depression is most effective when used in combination with counseling or psychotherapy. Adopting appropriate strategies can help you achieve a happier, healthier future”.11

Health Topics A-Z

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Links

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Sources

Where may I find the Sources quoted above?

You may find the Sources at:

Sources

  1. Depression, Mood Swings, Anxiety: Menopause and Mood Disorders. North American Menopause Society http://www.menopause.org/for-women/sexual-health-menopause-online/causes-of-sexual-problems/depression-mood-swings-anxiety Accessed: 05 November 2019
  2. Menopause FAQs: Menopause Symptoms: Q. My family tells me that I’ve become moody, and I admit that I sometimes feel blue or short-tempered. Menopause? North American Menopause Society http://www.menopause.org/for-women/menopause-faqs-menopause-symptoms Accessed: 05 November 2019
  3. What Is Menopause? Psychological Symptoms of Menopause. Content Updated February 2016. Australasian Menopause Society https://www.menopause.org.au/hp/information-sheets/185-what-is-menopause Accessed:  05 November 2019
  4. Symptoms of Menopause: Menopause & Mood. Last Updated 04 February 2019 — Last Reviewed 17 December 2017. Jean Hailes http://jeanhailes.org.au/health-a-z/menopause/menopause-symptoms/ Accessed: 05 November 2019
  5. Mental Health & Emotions: Depression, Anxiety & Menopause. Last Updated 04 February 2019 — Last Revised 17 December 2017. Jean Hailes http://jeanhailes.org.au/health-a-z/menopause/mental-health-emotions/ Accessed: 05 November 2019
  6. Menopause FAQs: Menopause Symptoms: Q. My family tells me that I’ve become moody, and I admit that I sometimes feel blue or short-tempered. Menopause? North American Menopause Society http://www.menopause.org/for-women/menopause-faqs-menopause-symptoms Accessed: 05 November 2019
  7. Depression, Mood Swings, Anxiety: Menopause and Mood Disorders. North American Menopause Society http://www.menopause.org/for-women/sexual-health-menopause-online/causes-of-sexual-problems/depression-mood-swings-anxiety Accessed: 05 November 2019
  8. Menopause: Treatment – Mood Changes. Page Last Reviewed: 29 August 2018. NHS (National Health Service) https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/menopause/treatment/#mood-changes Accessed: 05 November 2019
  9. 5 Things You Should Know About Stress: 4. There Are Ways To Manage Stress. National Institute of Mental Health https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/stress/index.shtml#pub4 Accessed: 05 November 2019
  10. Revised Global Consensus Statement on Menopausal Hormone Therapy: Section A: Benefit/Risk Profile of MHT. Climacteric, 2016;19:4:314 http://www.imsociety.org/manage/images/pdf/ba6379e868044bec13015ac2b84f2753.pdf Accessed: 05 November 2019
  11. Going Mad In Perimenopause? Signs and Solutions: Seek Support. North American Menopause Society http://www.menopause.org/for-women/menopauseflashes/menopause-symptoms-and-treatments/going-mad-in-perimenopause-signs-and-solutions Accessed: 05 November 2019
Topic Last Updated: 05 November 2019 – Topic Last Reviewed: 05 November 2019
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