Menopause Self-Care builds on our self-care to date; our menopause symptom management; our healthy lifestyle, diet, weight, regular physical activity and more…

Self-Care

What is self-care?

Depending on the Source the definition of self-care may vary. In Self-Care for Health and Wellbeing the World Health Organization’s (WHO) definition is:

“WHO defines self-care as the ability of individuals, families and communities to promote their own health, prevent disease, maintain health, and to cope with illness with or without the support of a health or care worker”.

Self-Care Actions and Interventions

What are the two parts to self-care?

In Self-Care Month 2024: What Is Self-Care? the WHO elaborate on:

“Did you know there are two parts to self-care?

Self-care actions and self-care interventions

Self-care actions
Self-care actions are habits, practices and lifestyle choices – things that we can do to help look after ourselves and lead a healthier life. They include but are not limited to:

  • Taking regular physical activity…
  • Eating a healthier diet…
  • Looking after our mental health…
  • Quitting or cutting down on alcohol and tobacco”.

Self-care interventions

Self-care interventions are the evidence-based tools that support self-care. They include quality medicines, devices, diagnostic, and digital tools. Now is an exciting time with more and more tools being developed”.

Menopause Self-Care

How can self-care apply to menopause?

Menopause Self-CareIn Menopause Fact Sheet: Managing Your Menopause – General Tips To Help With Menopause Symptoms the Self Care Forum in collaboration with the NHS National Menopause Clinical Reference Group, elaborate on:

“Lifestyle changes and self care can help you during the perimenopause and menopause whether or not you are using HRT. Make sure you rest when you need to, eat a healthy diet, maintain a healthy weight, take physical exercise regularly, find time to relax, cut down on alcohol, share with other people going through the menopause and if you smoke, talk to your pharmacist or GP practice about an NHS stopping smoking programme”.

In their Menopause Wellness Hub the (British) Women’s Health Concern explain:

“However you choose to manage your menopause symptoms, your lifestyle choices are going to be the cornerstone of any treatment plan you choose.

Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT), Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) and other complementary and alternative treatments can all be very helpful, but the transition to menopause is a good time to review your lifestyle. Not only can this help manage menopausal symptoms in the short term, it can lay the foundations for good health through perimenopause, menopause, and the years to come”.
Menopause Self-Care

Menopause Depression and Self-Care

How can self-care apply to menopause depression?

On page one in Menopause and Depression: Recognizing Depressive Symptoms and Depression the North American Menopause Society elaborate on:

“When you are transitioning into menopause, you should notify your healthcare practitioner whether you have suffered from depression in the past or whether you were particularly sensitive to hormone changes and have experienced premenstrual syndrome or postpartum depression. Be alert and notice whether these mood changes are mild and do not greatly affect your quality of life or whether they are severe and debilitating and interfere with your daily activities”.

Health Care Provider

What if I would like help with menopause self-care?

If you would like help with menopause self-care, it may be in your best interest to choose to talk to your health care provider about this.

In Menopause Fact Sheet: Managing Your Menopause – When To Seek Medical Help the Self Care Forum in collaboration with the NHS National Menopause Clinical Reference Group, explain:

“See a health professional at your GP practice if you think you have perimenopause or menopause symptoms and one of the following:

  • You want to know more about treatment
  • You want to discuss contraception
  • You are under 45
  • You are already on hormonal treatment or have had a hysterectomy
  • Your periods have stopped unexpectedly or have become a problem
  • Any of your symptoms have become a problem

See a GP at your practice if:

  • It is more than a year after your last period, you are not on HRT and you experience vaginal bleeding”.

Who is a GP?

Dots and/or DotC (Depending on the Country) a GP may be a registered general practitioner, a medical practitioner, a medical doctor or a doctor.

What is the NHS?

NHS can be an abbreviation for the (United Kingdom) National Health Service.

What is HRT?

HRT can be an abbreviation for the Hormone Replacement Therapy.

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Last Updated: 03 July 2024 – Last Revised: 03 July 2024

Menopause News 2024 What’s Hot showcases some evidence-based menopause news by menopause societies and international sources.

Menopause News July 2024

What is some Menopause News July 2024 What’s Hot?

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Menopause News June 2024

What is some Menopause News June 2024 What’s Hot?

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Last Updated: 14 July 2024 – Last Revised: 01 May 2024

Menopause Videos 2024 What’s Hot showcases some evidence-based menopause videos by menopause societies and other international sources.

European Menopause and Andropause Society

International Menopause Society

Menopause Society
[formerly The North American Menopause Society]

Health Care Provider

What if I would like to find out what information in menopause videos 2024 is applicable to me?

If you would like to find out what information in menopause videos 2024 is applicable to you, it may be in your best interest to choose to talk to your health care provider about this.

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Last Updated: 04 July 2024 – Last Revised: 01 July 2024

World Menopause Day

World Menopause Day 2024 What’s HotWhen is World Menopause Day (WMD) held?

In World Menopause Day the International Menopause Society (IMS) explain:

“World Menopause Day is held every year on the 18th of October. The purpose of the day is to raise awareness of the menopause and the support options available for improving health and wellbeing”.

World Menopause Day 2024

World Menopause Day 2024 What’s HotWhat is the theme for WMD 2024?

In World Menopause Day the International Menopause Society (IMS) announced:

“The theme for World Menopause Day 2024 is Menopause Hormone Therapy”.

2024 Theme

What do the IMS explain about the 2024 WMD theme?

In World Menopause Day the IMS elaborate on:

“The 2024 IMS White paper, and theme of World Menopause Day, aims to report on the current controversies regarding prescribing of menopause hormone therapy (MHT).

It will examine controversial topics within each one of these categories such as

  • Who should use MHT?…
  • What should be used?…
  • When should MHT be started?…
  • Why is MHT important?
  • Where can MHT be accessed?…

The overall aim of this White paper will be to provide a well-balanced blueprint for both Healthcare Professionals and the public for managing the menopause with MHT, where appropriate to do so”.

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Last Updated: 01 July 2024 – Last Revised: 01 July 2024

Complementary and Integrative Health and Menopause Snapshot can be a place to start if you are searching for evidence-based information about complementary and integrative health and menopause.

Menopause Symptoms

What is known about the use of complementary and integrative health for the management of menopause symptoms?

In Menopause: Diagnosis & Treatment – Treatment: Alternative Medicine, published 25 May 2023, the (United States) Mayo Clinic elaborate on:


Complementary and Integrative Health and Menopause Snapshot“Many approaches have been promoted as aids in managing the symptoms of menopause, but few of them have scientific evidence to back up the claims. Some complementary and alternative treatments that have been or are being studied include:

  • Plant Estrogens (Phytoestrogens)…
  • Bioidentical Hormones…
  • Black Cohosh…
  • Yoga…
  • Acupuncture…
  • Hypnosis…”.

Herbal Therapies

Are herbal therapies safe?

On page one in Complementary & Alternative Therapies: Non Hormonal Treatments for Menopause Symptoms, reviewed November 2023, the (British) Women’s Health Concern note:

“One of the powerful messages coming from the NICE Guideline is that herbal remedies which are not regulated by a medicine authority should not be considered safe for all, as there is much variety in their effectiveness and potency and that there may be significant side effects or interactions. The same warning is given for compounded bioidentical hormone therapy which is also not regulated or subject to the same quality control as conventional HRT”.

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Last Updated: 09 January 2024 – Last Revised: 09 January 2024

Early Menopause Snapshot can be a place to start for evidence-based information about early menopause. Are you between 40 and 45 years?

Early MenopauseEarly Menopause Snapshot

What is early menopause

In Premature and Early Menopause the (Australian) Jean Hailes for Women’s Health’s (JH) definition of early menopause is:

“Early menopause is when your final period happens between the ages of 40 and 45”.

Premature MenopauseEarly Menopause Snapshot

What is premature menopause

In Premature and Early Menopause the JH’s definition of premature menopause is:

“Premature menopause is when your final period happens before the age of 40 years”.

Different Differences

How are early menopause and premature menopause different?

In Early or Premature Menopause: What Is the Difference Between Early and Premature Menopause? the Office on Women’s Health, United States Department of Health and Human Services, Womenshealth.gov elaborate on:

“Early or premature menopause happens when ovaries stop making hormones and periods stop at a younger age than usual (the average age for menopause in the United States is 52). This can happen naturally or for a medical reason, such as when both ovaries are removed in a hysterectomy.

Early and premature menopause can have the same causes. The only difference is the age at which it happens. Menopause that happens before age 45 is called early menopause. Menopause that happens before age 40 is called premature menopause.

Women who have gone through early or premature menopause cannot get pregnant”.

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Last Updated: 15 April 2024 – Last Revised: 15 April 2024

Hormone Therapy Alternatives Snapshot can be a place to start if you are searching for information about hormone therapy alternatives.

2023 Nonhormone Therapy Position Statement of The North American Menopause Society

What were the Results in the 2023 Nonhormone Therapy Position Statement of The North American Menopause Society?

On page one in the The 2023 Nonhormone Therapy Position Statement of The North American Menopause Society: Abstract – Results, published May 2023, the results were:

Results: Evidence-based review of the literature resulted in several nonhormone options for the treatment of vasomotor symptoms.

Recommended: Cognitive-behavioral therapy, clinical hypnosis, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors/serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, gabapentin, fezolinetant (Level I); oxybutynin (Levels I-II); weight loss, stellate ganglion block (Levels II-III).

Not recommended: Paced respiration (Level I); supplements/herbal remedies (Levels I-II); cooling techniques, avoiding triggers, exercise, yoga, mindfulness-based intervention, relaxation, suvorexant, soy foods and soy extracts, soy metabolite equol, cannabinoids, acupuncture, calibration of neural oscillations (Level II); chiropractic interventions, clonidine; (Levels I-III); dietary modification and pregabalin (Level III)”.

What do the Levels mean in the 2023 Nonhormone Therapy Position Statement of The North American Menopause Society?

On page one in the The 2023 Nonhormone Therapy Position Statement of The North American Menopause Society: Abstract – Methods the North American Menopause Society (NAMS) elaborate on:

Methods: The panel assessed the most current and available literature to determine whether to recommend or not recommend use based on these levels of evidence:

  • Level I, good and consistent scientific evidence
  • Level II, limited or inconsistent scientific evidence
  • Level III, consensus and expert opinion”.3

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Fezolinetant (Veozah)

What is Fezolinetant (Veozah)?

In FDA Approves Novel Drug To Treat Moderate To Severe Hot Flashes Caused By Menopause, published 12 May 2023, the (United States) Food and Drug Administration (FDA) elaborate on:

“Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Veozah (fezolinetant), an oral medication for the treatment of moderate to severe vasomotor symptoms, or hot flashes, caused by menopause. Veozah is the first neurokinin 3 (NK3) receptor antagonist approved by the FDA to treat moderate to severe hot flashes from menopause. It works by binding to and blocking the activities of the NK3 receptor, which plays a role in the brain’s regulation of body temperature”.

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Last Updated: 16 October 2023 – Last Revised: 16 October 2023

Hormone Therapy Snapshot can be a place to start if you are searching for information about hormone therapy (HT), hormone replacement therapy (HRT) or menopausal hormone therapy (MHT).

Most Effective Treatment

Is hormone therapy (HT) the most effective treatment for vasomotor symptoms or hot flushes/flashes and night sweats?

On page one in Deciding About Hormone Therapy Use: Potential Benefits, published July 2022, the North American Menopause Society explain:


Hormone Therapy Snapshot
“Hormone therapy is one of the most effective treatments available for bothersome hot flashes and night sweats. If hot flashes and night sweats are disrupting your daily activities and sleep, HT may improve sleep and fatigue, mood, ability to concentrate, and overall quality of life. Treatment of bothersome hot flashes and night sweats is the principal reason women use HT. Hormone therapy also treats vaginal dryness and painful sex associated with menopause. Hormone therapy keeps your bones strong by preserving bone density and decreasing your risk of osteoporosis and fractures. If preserving bone density is your only concern, and you do not have bothersome hot flashes, other treatments may be recommended instead of HT”.

On page two in the Joint Position Statement By the British Menopause Society, Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists and Society for Endocrinology on Best Practice Recommendations for the Care of Women Experiencing the Menopause first published online 10 June 2022, one of the recommendations is:

  • “The decision whether to take HRT, the dose and duration of its use should be made on an individualised basis after discussing the benefits and risks with each patient. This should be considered in the context of the overall benefits obtained from using HRT including symptom control and improving quality of life as well as considering the bone and cardiovascular benefits associated with HRT use. Discussions with women should also cover aspects such as when to consider stopping HRT and how this can be done (by gradually reducing the dose of HRT). No arbitrary limits should be set on age or duration of HRT intake”.

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Last Updated: 16 October 2023 – Last Revised: 16 October 2023

Hot Flushes Snapshot can be a place to start if you are searching for information about menopausal hot flushes or hot flashes. Between 70 – 80% of women experience hot flushes.

Definition

What can it be helpful to know about hot flushes/flashes?

In Hot Flashes: Symptoms and Causes – Overview the (United States) Mayo Clinic explain:

“A hot flash is the sudden feeling of warmth in the upper body, which is usually most intense over the face, neck and chest. Your skin might redden, as if you’re blushing. A hot flash can also cause sweating. If you lose too much body heat, you might feel chilled afterward. Night sweats are hot flashes that happen at night, and they may disrupt your sleep”.

Treatment

What are some hot flushes/flashes treatment?

On page one in Deciding About Hormone Therapy Use the North American Menopause Society elaborate on:


Hot Flushes Snapshot
“Many women experience hot flashes, vaginal dryness, and other physical changes with menopause. For some women, the symptoms are mild and do not require any treatment. For others, symptoms are moderate or severe and interfere with daily activities. Hot flashes improve with time, but some women have bothersome hot flashes for many years. Menopause symptoms often improve with lifestyle changes and nonprescription remedies, but prescription therapies also are available, if needed. Government-approved treatments for bothersome hot flashes include hormone therapy (HT) containing estrogen, as well as a nonhormone medication (paroxetine)”.

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Last Updated: 21 October 2023 – Last Revised: 21 October 2023

Menopause in multiply languages snapshot includes Arabic, Bulgarian, Cantonese, Chinese (Simplified), Dutch, French, Gaelic, German, Hindi, Italian, Japanese, Korean and more languages.

Menopause In Multiply Languages Snapshot

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Last Updated: 01 July 2024 – Last Revised: 01 July 2024