“Mammograms can save your life.
Finding breast cancer early reduces your risk of
dying from the disease by 25-30% or more”.1

Umbrella
What may the Breast Cancer Screening Umbrella include?

Depending on the Source (DotS) this Umbrella may include:

  • Breast Cancer (Female) Screening
  • Breast Cancer Early Detection
  • Breast Cancer Screening
  • Breast Screening
  • Breast X-Ray Screening

Cancer Screening

What is cancer screening?

DotS the definition of cancer screening may vary. In Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ)–Patient Version: What Is Screening? the (United States) National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) definition is:

“Screening is looking for signs of disease, such as breast cancer, before a person has symptoms”.2

Breast Screening

What is breast screening?

DotS the definition of breast screening may vary. In Breast Cancer: Breast Screening the [United Kingdom) Cancer Research UK’s definition is:

“Screening aims to find breast cancers early, when they have the best chance of being cured”.3

Early Detection

What is the most effective way to detect breast cancer early?

In Mammograms: What Is the Best Method of Detecting Breast Cancer As Early As Possible? the Office on Women’s Health, United States Department of Health and Human Services, Womenshealth.gov elaborate on:

“A high-quality mammogram plus a clinical breast exam, an exam done by your doctor, is the most effective way to detect breast cancer early. Finding breast cancer early greatly improves a woman’s chances for successful treatment”.4

In 10 Important Things To Know About Mammograms the (United States) Breastcancer.org elaborate on:

“Mammograms can save your life.
Finding breast cancer early reduces your risk of dying from the disease by 25-30% or more”.5

Mammogram

What is a mammogram?

In Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ)–Patient Version: Breast Cancer Screening – Mammography Is the Most Common Screening Test for Breast Cancer [+ Images] the NCI elaborate on:

“A mammogram is an x-ray picture of the breast. Mammography may find tumors that are too small to feel. It may also find ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). In DCIS, abnormal cells line the breast duct, and in some women may become invasive cancer”.6

How is a mammogram performed?

In Mammography: Summary [+ Image] the (United States) MedlinePlus elaborate on:

“When you have a mammogram, you stand in front of an x-ray machine. The person who takes the x-rays places your breast between two plastic plates. The plates press your breast and make it flat. This may be uncomfortable, but it helps get a clear picture”.7

Why should women have mammograms?

In Mammograms: Why Should I Have One? [+ Image] the (United States) Food and Drug Administration (FDA) elaborate on:

“Mammograms can help save lives. They are still the best way to screen for breast cancer. They can find breast lumps when they are too small for a woman or her doctor to feel”.8

Breast Implants

If women have breast implants is breast cancer screening harmful?

In Breast Checks: Mammograms – Breast Implants the (Australian) Jean Hailes for Women’s Health note:

“If you have breast implants, screening is not harmful. Just let your doctor and screening centre know you have implants before a mammogram is performed”.9

Clinical Breast Exam

What is a clinical breast exam (CBE)?

In Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ)–Patient Version: Breast Cancer Screening – Other Screening Tests Have Been or Are Being Studies In Clinical Trials: Clinical Breast Exams (CBE) [+ Images] the NCI elaborate on:

“A clinical breast exam is an exam of the breast by a doctor or other health professional. He or she will carefully feel the breasts and under the arms for lumps or anything else that seems unusual. It is not known if having clinical breast exams decreases the chance of dying from breast cancer”.10

The NCI also note:

“Breast self-exams may be done by women or men to check their breasts for lumps or other changes. If you feel any lumps or notice any other changes in your breasts, talk to your doctor. Doing regular breast self-exams has not been shown to decrease the chance of dying from breast cancer”.11

Start

When may women start having regular breast cancer screening?

Depending on You (DoY), DotS and/or Depending on Your Country’s (DoyC’s) breast cancer screening program, when women may start having regular breast screening can vary. It may therefore be in your best interest to choose to check what’s-what for you.

Breast Cancer Screening

In 10 Important Things To Know About Mammograms: Slide 10 the (United States) Breastcancer.org elaborate on:

“Women should get a mammogram once a year beginning at age 40”.12

In 10 Important Things To Know About Mammograms: Slide 10 Breastcancer.org also note:

“If you’re at high risk of breast cancer, have a strong family history of breast or ovarian cancer, or have had radiation treatment to the chest in the past, it’s recommended that you start having annual mammograms at a younger age (often beginning around age 30). Discuss your personalized screening plan with your healthcare provider”.13

How Often

How often may women have regular breast cancer screening?

DoY, DotS and/or DoYC’s breast screening program, how often women may have regular breast cancer screening can vary. It may therefore be in your best interest to choose to check what’s-what for you.

Stop

When may women stop having regular breast cancer screening?

DoY, DotS and/or DoYC’s breast screening program, when women may stop having regular breast cancer screening can vary. It may therefore be in your best interest to choose to check what’s-what for you.

Screening Programs

Where may women find information about breast cancer screening or early detection programs?

Women may find information about breast cancer screening or early detection programs from their health care provider or their country’s equivalent of a local community health center, national and/or state Department/Center/Institute of Aging/Cancer/Disease Control and Prevention/Health/Human Services.

Your country may have a breast cancer early detection program similar to the (United States) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) program.

In National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP): Find A Screening Program Near You the CDC elaborate on:

“CDC’s National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) provides breast and cervical cancer screenings and diagnostic services to low-income, uninsured, and underinsured women across the United States”.14

Health Care Provider

What if I think I have breast changes?

If you think you have breast changes, it may be in your best interest to choose to talk to your health care provider about this as soon as possible.

In Mammograms: Why Should I Have One? the FDA caution:

“Mammograms can not find all problems. So, every woman should work with her doctor to check her breasts. Call your doctor or clinic if you notice any change in your breasts like:

  • A lump
  • Thickening
  • Liquid leaking from the nipple or changes in how the nipple looks”.15


In Breast Cancer Diagnosis: Participation In the NHS Breast Screening Programme (NHSBSP) the (British) Women’s Health Concern also encourage us to get checked, any changes we notice:

  • “As cancers can develop between screening mammograms or be missed by a screening mammogram, it is still important to be breast aware and report any new breast symptoms or signs to your GP. Do not wait until the next scheduled mammogram to check these out”.16

Who is a GP?

DotS and/or DotC (Depending on the Country) a GP may be a qualified and registered general practitioner, a medical practitioner, a medical doctor or a doctor.

Health Topics A-Z

Where may I find Health Topics related to Breast Cancer Screening?

In Health Topics A-Z you may find:

Links

Where may I find Links related to Breast Cancer Screening?

Your Country may have Links similar to:

Sources

Where may I find the Sources quoted?

You may find the Sources quoted at:

Sources

  1. 10 Important Things To Know About Mammograms. Last Modified on 06 February 2020. Breastcancer.org https://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/slideshows/mammograms Accessed: 17 May 2021
  2. Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ)–Patient Version: What Is Screening? Updated: 16 December 2020. National Cancer Institute https://www.cancer.gov/types/breast/patient/breast-screening-pdq#_13 Accessed: 17 May 2021
  3. Breast Cancer: Breast Screening. Last Reviewed: 03 September  2020. Cancer Research UK https://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/breast-cancer/getting-diagnosed/screening/breast-screening Accessed: 17 May 2021
  4. Mammograms: What Is the Best Method of Detecting Breast Cancer As Early As Possible? Page Last Updated: 01 April 2019. Womenshealth.gov https://www.womenshealth.gov/a-z-topics/mammograms Accessed: 17 May 2021
  5. 10 Important Things To Know About Mammograms. Last Modified on 06 February 2020. Breastcancer.org https://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/slideshows/mammograms Accessed: 17 May 2021
  6. Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ)–Patient Version: Breast Cancer Screening – Mammography Is the Most Common Screening Test for Breast Cancer [+ Images]. Updated: 16 December 2020. National Cancer Institute https://www.cancer.gov/types/breast/patient/breast-screening-pdq#_13 Accessed: 17 May 2021
  7. Mammography: Summary. Page Last Updated on: 07 May 2021. Topic Last Reviewed: 22 October 2018. MedlinePlus https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/mammography.html Accessed: 17 May 2021
  8. Mammograms. Why Should I Have One? Content Current As of: 29 May 2019. Food and Drug Administration https://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ByAudience/ForWomen/ucm118546.htm Accessed: 17 May 2021
  9. Breast Checks: Mammograms – Breast Implants. Last Updated: 15 January 2020 |  Last Reviewed 30 October 2018. Jean Hailes for Women’s Health http://jeanhailes.org.au/health-a-z/breast-health/breast-checks/ Accessed: 17 May 2021
  10. Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ)–Patient Version: Breast Cancer Screening – Other Screening Tests Have Been or Are Being Studies In Clinical Trials: Clinical Breast Exams (CBE) [+ Images]. Updated: 16 December 2020. National Cancer Institute https://www.cancer.gov/types/breast/patient/breast-screening-pdq#section/_13 Accessed: 17 May 2021
  11. Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ)–Patient Version: Breast Cancer Screening – Other Screening Tests Have Been or Are Being Studies In Clinical Trials: Clinical Breast Exams (CBE) [ Images]. Updated: 16 December 2020. National Cancer Institute https://www.cancer.gov/types/breast/patient/breast-screening-pdq#section/_13 Accessed: 17 May 2021
  12. 10 Important Things To Know About Mammograms: Slide 10. Last Modified on 06 February 2020. Breastcancer.org https://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/slideshows/mammograms Accessed: 17 May 2021
  13. 10 Important Things To Know About Mammograms: Slide 10. Last Modified on 06 February 2020. Breastcancer.org https://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/slideshows/mammograms Accessed: 17 May 2021
  14. National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP): Find A Screening Program Near You. Page Last Reviewed: 16 December 2019. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/nbccedp/screenings.htm Accessed: 17 May 2021
  15. Mammograms: Why Should I Have One? Content Current As of: 29 May 2019. Food and Drug Administration https://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ByAudience/ForWomen/ucm118546.htm Accessed: 17 May 2021
  16. Diagnosing Breast Conditions: Participation In the NHS Breast Screening Programme (NHSBSP). Updated Date: 20 April 2021. Women’s Health Concern https://www.womens-health-concern.org/help-and-advice/factsheets/diagnosing-breast-conditions/ Accessed: 15 June 2021

Topic Last Updated: 15 June 2021 – Topic Last Reviewed: 17 May 2021
Print Friendly, PDF & Email