“There are more than 100 types of cancer. Types of cancer are usually named for the organs or tissues where the cancers form”.1

Umbrella
What may the Cancer Umbrella include?

Depending on the Source (DotS) this Umbrella may include:

  • Cancer/s
  • Carcinomas
  • Malignancies
  • Malignant Tumors/Tumours
  • Neoplasms
  • Tumors/Tumours

Terminology

Can cancer mean different things to different people?

I think the term cancer can be like the terms diet, love and menopause and mean different things, to different people, at different times, in different places.

When I use the term cancer what I mean may be different to what someone else means or what is meant in medicaltalk.

It can therefore be important when the term cancer is used to be clear about what’s-what, so we may work out if we are on the same page meaning the same thing, or not.

When the term cancer is used it may also be important to be clear about the type of cancer such as:

  • Bowel Cancer/Cancer of the Colon/Rectum
  • Breast Cancer
  • Cervical Cancer
  • Colorectal Cancer
  • Endometrial Cancer
  • Lung Cancer
  • Other Cancers
  • Ovarian Cancer
  • Uterine Cancer

Definition

What is cancer?

DotS the definition of cancer may vary. The World Health Organization’s (WHO) definition is:

“Cancer is a generic term for a large group of diseases that can affect any part of the body. Other terms used are malignant tumours and neoplasms. One defining feature of cancer is the rapid creation of abnormal cells that grow beyond their usual boundaries, and which can then invade adjoining parts of the body and spread to other organs; the latter process is referred to as metastasis. Metastases are the primary cause of death from cancer”.2

The (United States) National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) definition is:

“Cancer is a disease in which some of the body’s cells grow uncontrollably and spread to other parts of the body”.3

Types

How many types of cancer are there?

In What Is Cancer? Types of Cancer the (United States) National Cancer Institute (NCI) also note:

“There are more than 100 types of cancer. Types of cancer are usually named for the organs or tissues where the cancers form. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and brain cancer starts in the brain. Cancers also may be described by the type of cell that formed them, such as an epithelial cell or a squamous cell”.4

Menopause

Is there an association between menopause and cancer?

In Menopause FAQs: Your Health After Menopause – Q. Is There Any Relationship Between Menopause and Cancer? the North American Menopause Society elaborate on:

“A. No, menopause itself doesn’t increase the risk of cancer. Cancers are more common as people age, however. Most cancers occur in people age 55 and older”.5

Aging

Is there an association between aging and cancer?

Yes. The International Menopause Society (IMS) note:

“With aging, the incidence of all cancers is expected to increase. For women, the most important cancers are breast, colon, endometrial, ovarian and lung cancer. Also, in the developing world cervical cancer is a major cause of death in women. Possible prevention of these cancers by lifestyle changes and appropriate screening gains more importance after menopause”.6

Early Detection

Is there an association between early detection and cancer?

Yes. Cancer Australia explain:

“Finding cancer at an early stage increases the chances of successful treatment and improved survival”.7

Health Care Provider

What if I would like to lower my risk of cancer?

If you would like to lower your risk of cancer, it may be in your best interest to choose to talk to your health care provider about this.

In Skin Cancer Prevention (PDQ)–Patient Version: Skin Cancer Prevention – Avoiding Risk Factors and Increasing Protective Factors May Help Prevent Cancer the NCI elaborate on:

“Avoiding cancer risk factors may help prevent certain cancers. Risk factors include smoking, being overweight, and not getting enough exercise. Increasing protective factors such as quitting smoking and exercising may also help prevent some cancers. Talk to your doctor or other health care professional about how you might lower your risk of cancer”.8

Health Topics A-Z

Where may I find Health Topics related to Cancer?

In Health Topics A-Z you may find:

Links

Where may I find Links related to Cancer?

Your Country may have Links similar to:

Sources

Where may I find the Sources quoted?

You may find the Sources quoted at:

Sources

  1. What Is Cancer? Types of Cancer. Updated: 05 May 2021. National Institute of Cancer https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/understanding/what-is-cancer#types Accessed: 03 June 2021
  2. Cancer. 03 March 2021. World Health Organization https://www.who.int/en/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/cancer Accessed: 03 June 2021
  3. What Is Cancer? The Definition of Cancer. Updated: 05 May 2021. National Institute of Cancer https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/understanding/what-is-cancer#related-diseases Accessed: 03 June 2021
  4. What Is Cancer? Types of Cancer. Updated: 05 May 2021. National Institute of Cancer https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/understanding/what-is-cancer#types Accessed: 03 June 2021
  5. Menopause FAQs: Your Health After Menopause – Q. Is There Any Relationship Between Menopause and Cancer? North American Menopause Society https://www.menopause.org/for-women/menopause-faqs-your-health-after-menopause Accessed: 03 June 2021
  6. Maintaining Health and Preventing Disease After the Menopause: Preventing Cancer Post Menopause. 2014:3 International Menopause Society https://www.imsociety.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/wmd-2014-leaflet-english.pdf Accessed: 03 June 2021
  7. Screening. Cancer Australia https://canceraustralia.gov.au/healthy-living/screening Accessed: 03 June 2021
  8. Skin Cancer Prevention (PDQ)–Patient Version: Skin Cancer Prevention – Avoiding Risk Factors and Increasing Protective Factors May Help Prevent Cancer. Updated: 23 April 2021. National Cancer Institute https://www.cancer.gov/types/skin/patient/skin-prevention-pdq#link/_16 Accessed: 03 June 2021

Topic Last Updated: 03 June 2021 – Topic Last Reviewed: 03 June 2021
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