“Many women find the time around menopause stressful.
This may be partially due to hormonal changes and
resulting bothersome symptoms such as hot flashes and…”.1

Umbrella
What may the Stress Umbrella include?

Depending on the Source (DotS) this Umbrella may include:

  • Psychological Stress
  • Stress

Definition

What is stress?

DotS the definition of stress may vary. The (United States) National Institute of Mental Health’s (CDC) definition is:

“Stress is the physical or mental response to an external cause, such as having a lot of homework or having an illness. A stressor may be a one-time or short-term occurrence, or it can happen repeatedly over a long time”.2

The (Australian) Jean Hailes for Women’s Health definition is:

“Stress occurs when you feel you are not coping with life.

We all need a little stress to motivate us to achieve or get things done. However, too much stress, particularly over a long period of time, can take its toll on your health and sense of wellbeing. Extreme stress can be so overwhelming it causes physical reactions such as nausea, diarrhoea, over eating and under eating. There are many things you can do to manage stress; it is just about finding the right strategy for you”.3

Chronic Stress

What may chronic stress cause?

The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) explain:

“Chronic stress is not good for anyone’s health. It may cause increased blood pressure and heart rate, headaches, gastric reflux, depression/anxiety, and, over the long term, an increased risk for heart disease. Some believe that chronic stress may affect our immune system, making us more susceptible to illness, infections, and even cancer. Stress affects not only our health but also our relationships, work performance, general sense of well-being, and quality of life”.4

Menopause

Is there an association between menopause and stress?

In Stress: Getting Serious About Solutions the NAMS elaborate on:

Stress
“Many women find the time around menopause stressful. This may be partially due to hormonal changes and resulting bothersome symptoms such as hot flashes and disrupted sleep. In addition, family and personal issues such as the demands of teenage children, children leaving home, aging parents, midlife spouses, and career changes often converge on women during these years”.5

Self-Help

What can I try to relieve stress?

In Violence Prevention: Coping With Stress – Healthy Ways To Cope With Stress the (United States) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention include:

“Feeling emotional and nervous or having trouble sleeping and eating can all be normal reactions to stress. Here are some healthy ways you can deal with stress:

  • Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories…
  • Take care of yourself…
  • Take care of your body…
  • Make time to unwind…
  • Talk to others…
  • Connect with your community- or faith-based organizations…
  • Avoid drugs and alcohol…
  • Recognize when you need more help. If problems continue or you are thinking about suicide, talk to a psychologist, social worker, or professional counselor”.6

Online Resources, Programs and Apps

Are online stress management resources, programs and Apps available?

DotC (Depending on the Country) online stress management resources, programs and apps may be available.

Your health care provider or local community health center may know of your country’s recommended online stress management resources, programs and Apps similar to anxiety Online Resources and Programs, by the (Australian) Jean Hailes for Women’s Health.

Health Care Provider

What if my stress is stressing me?

I'm So Stressed Out! Fact SheetIf your stress is stressing you, it may be in your best interest to choose to talk to your health care provider about this.

In I’m So Stressed Out! Fact Sheet: Recognize When You Need More Help the NIMH elaborate on:

“If you are struggling to cope, or the symptoms of your stress or anxiety won’t go away, it may be time to talk to a professional. Psychotherapy (also called “talk therapy”) and medication are the two main treatments for anxiety, and many people benefit from a combination of the two”.7

Health Topics A-Z

Where may I find Health Topics related to Stress?

In Health Topics A-Z you may find:

Links

Where may I find Links related to Stress?

Your Country may have Links similar to:

Sources

Where may I find the Sources quoted?

You may find the Sources quoted at:

Sources

  1. Stress: Getting Serious About Solutions. North American Menopause Society https://www.menopause.org/for-women/menopauseflashes/mental-health-at-menopause/stress-getting-serious-about-solutions Accessed: 14 November 2022
  2. I’m So Stressed Out! Fact Sheet. National Institute of Mental Health https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/so-stressed-out-fact-sheet Accessed: 14 November 2022
  3. Stress. Last Updated: 13 January 2020 | Last Reviewed: 10 March 2014. Jean Hailes for Women’s Health https://jeanhailes.org.au/health-a-z/mental-emotional-health/stress Accessed: 14 November 2022
  4. Stress: Getting Serious About Solutions. North American Menopause Society https://www.menopause.org/for-women/menopauseflashes/mental-health-at-menopause/stress-getting-serious-about-solutions Accessed: 14 November 2022
  5. Stress: Getting Serious About Solutions. North American Menopause Society https://www.menopause.org/for-women/menopauseflashes/mental-health-at-menopause/stress-getting-serious-about-solutions Accessed: 14 November 2022
  6. Violence Prevention: Coping With Stress – Healthy Ways To Cope With Stress. Page Last Reviewed: 30 November 2021. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/suicide/copingwith-stresstips.html Accessed: 14 November 2022
  7. I’m So Stressed Out! Fact Sheet: Recognize When You Need More Help. National Institute of Mental Health https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/so-stressed-out-fact-sheet Accessed: 14 November 2022
Topic Last Updated: 14 November 2022 – Topic Last Reviewed: 14 November 2022

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