“People sometimes wait to see a dermatologist until their rosacea becomes unbearable. Dermatologists encourage you to make an appointment long before this happens”.1

Umbrella
What may the Rosacea Umbrella include?

Depending on the Source (DotS) this Umbrella may include:

  • Acne Rosacea
  • Adult Acne
  • Red Face
  • Rosacea

Definition

What is rosacea?

DotS the definition of rosacea may vary. The (United States) National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases’ (NIAMS) definition is:

“Rosacea (ro-ZAY-she-ah) is a long-term skin condition that causes reddened skin and a rash, usually on the nose and cheeks. It may also cause eye problems”.2

The (United States) National Rosacea Society’s definition is:

“Rosacea (pronounced “roh-ZAY-sha”) is a chronic but treatable condition that primarily affects the central face, and is often characterized by flare-ups and remissions”.3

First Signs

What are the first signs of rosacea?

In Rosacea: Check If You Have Rosacea the (United Kingdom) NHS elaborate on:

“The first signs of rosacea include:

  • Redness (blushing) across your nose, cheeks, forehead and chin that comes and goes
  • A burning or stinging feeling when using water or skincare products

The redness may be harder to see on darker skin”.4

Symptoms

What are the symptoms of rosacea?

In Rosacea: Basics – What Are the Symptoms of Rosacea? the NIAMS elaborate on:

“Most people only have some of the symptoms of rosacea, and the symptoms are different from one person to another. While the condition lasts a long time, rosacea often goes back and forth between flare-ups and times when you do not have symptoms.

The symptoms of rosacea include:

  • Redness on the face, usually on the nose and cheeks. Over time, your face may be red or flushed for longer periods. You may also feel tingling or burning, and the reddened skin may turn rough and scaly
  • Rash. You may develop red or pus-filled bumps and pimples that look like acne
  • Visible blood vessels. These typically show up as thin red lines on the cheeks and nose
  • Thickened skin, especially on the nose. This is one of the more severe symptoms, and it mostly affects men
  • Eye irritation. In what is called ocular rosacea, the eyes become sore, red, itchy, watery, or dry. It is important to see a health care provider for any eye symptoms. Eye damage and vision loss can happen if left untreated”.5

Cause

What causes rosacea?

In Rosacea: What Causes Rosacea? according to the NIAMS:

“Doctors do not know what causes rosacea, both genes and things in the environment likely play a role”.6

Triggers

What are some rosacea triggers?

In Rosacea: Triggers the NHS elaborate on:

“It’s not known what causes rosacea, but some triggers can make symptoms worse. Common triggers for rosacea include:

  • Alcohol
  • Spicy foods
  • Cheese
  • Caffeine
  • Hot drinks
  • Aerobic exercise like running”.7

In Factors That May Trigger Rosacea Flare-Ups and Rosacea Triggers Survey the (United States) National Rosacea Society include more triggers.


RosaceaRosacea

Diary

RosaceaIs there a diary to find and avoid personal rosacea triggers?

In Rosacea Diary Booklet: An Easy Way To Find and Avoid Your Personal Rosacea Triggers the National Rosacea Society explain how to use their diary.

Common or Not

How common is rosacea?

In If You Have Rosacea, You’re Not Alone according to the National Rosacea Society

“An estimated 16 million Americans have rosacea, yet only a small fraction are being treated”.8

Women

Is there an association between women and rosacea?

In Rosacea: Symptoms & Causes – Overview the (United States) Mayo Clinic elaborate on:

“Rosacea can affect anyone. But it’s most common in middle-aged white women”.9

Menopause

Is there an association between menopause and rosacea?

The NIAMS explain:


“Anyone can get rosacea, but it is more common among these groups:

  • Middle-aged and older adults
  • Women, but when men get it, it tends to be more severe
  • People with fair skin, but it may not be diagnosed as often in people with darker skin, since some symptoms may be harder to see in darker skin”.10

Treatment

How is rosacea treated?

In Rosacea: Rosacea Symptoms the International Rosacea Foundation explain:

“The International Rosacea Foundation provides recommendations for the best natural rosacea treatment for facial skin as well as ocular and eye treatment”.11

In Rosacea: Diagnosis & Treatment – Treatment the Mayo Clinic explain:

“Treatment for rosacea focuses on controlling signs and symptoms. Most often this requires a combination of good skin care and prescription drugs.

The duration of your treatment depends on the type and severity of your signs and symptoms. Recurrence is common”.12

In Rosacea: Treatment for Rosacea From A GP the NHS elaborate on:

“Rosacea cannot be cured but treatment from a GP can help control the symptoms. It can get worse if it’s not treated.

A GP may suggest:

  • Prescriptions for creams and gels you put on your skin
  • Taking antibiotics for 6 to 16 weeks
  • IPL (intense pulsed light) treatment…

The GP may refer you to a skin specialist (dermatologist) if treatments are not working”.13

Who is a GP?

DotS and/or DotC (Depending on the Country) a GP may be a qualified and registered general practitioner, a medical practitioner, a medical doctor or a doctor.

Health Care Provider

What if I think I have rosacea?

If you think you have rosacea, it may be in your best interest to choose to talk to your health care provider about this.

In All About Rosacea the National Rosacea Society explain:

“While the cause of rosacea is unknown and there is no cure, knowledge of its signs and symptoms has advanced to where they can be effectively controlled with medical therapy and lifestyle changes. Individuals who suspect they may have rosacea are urged to see a dermatologist or other qualified physician for diagnosis and appropriate treatment — before the disorder becomes increasingly severe and intrusive on daily life”.14

In Do You Have To Treat Rosacea? Worried Your Rosacea Is Not Serious Enough To Treat? the American Academy of Dermatology | Association encourage us to seek treatment early:

“People sometimes wait to see a dermatologist until their rosacea becomes unbearable. Dermatologists encourage you to make an appointment long before this happens.

The earlier you start treatment, the easier rosacea is to manage”.15

Health Topics A-Z

Where may I find Health Topics related to Rosacea?

In Health Topics A-Z may find:

Links

Where may I find Links related to Rosacea?

Your Country may have Links similar to:

Sources

Where may I find the Sources quoted?

You may find the Sources quoted at:

Sources

  1. Do You Have To Treat Rosacea? Worried Your Rosacea Is Not Serious Enough To Treat? American Academy of Dermatology | Association https://www.aad.org/public/diseases/rosacea/treatment/necessary Accessed: 16 December 2021
  2. Rosacea: Basics – What Is Rosacea? Last Reviewed: May 2021. National Institutes of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/rosacea Accessed: 16 December 2021
  3. All About Rosacea. National Rosacea Society https://www.rosacea.org/patients/allaboutrosacea.php Accessed: 16 December 2021
  4. Rosacea: Check If You Have Rosacea. Page Last Reviewed: 15 January 2020. NHS https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/rosacea/symptoms/ Accessed: 16 December 2021
  5. Rosacea: Basics – What Are the Symptoms of Rosacea? Last Reviewed: May 2021. National Institutes of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/rosacea#tab-symptoms Accessed: 16 December 2021
  6. Rosacea: Basics – What Causes Rosacea? Last Reviewed: May 2021. National Institutes of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/rosacea#tab-causes Accessed: 16 December 2021
  7. Rosacea: Triggers. Page Last Reviewed: 15 January 2020. NHS https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/rosacea/symptoms/ Accessed: 16 December 2021
  8. If You Have Rosacea, You’re Not Alone. National Rosacea Society https://www.rosacea.org/patients/index.php Accessed: 16 December 2021
  9. Rosacea: Diagnosis & Treatment – Treatment. 22 September 2021. Mayo Clinic https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/rosacea/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20353820 Accessed: 16 December 2021
  10. Rosacea: Basics – Who Gets Rosacea? May 2021. National Institutes of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/rosacea#tab-risk Accessed: 16 December 2021
  11. Acne Rosacea Treatments: Rosacea Treatment. International Rosacea Foundation http://www.internationalrosaceafoundation.org/ Accessed: 16 December 2021
  12. Rosacea: Symptoms & Causes – Overview. 22 September 2021. Mayo Clinic https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/rosacea/symptoms-causes/syc-20353815 Accessed: 16 December 2021
  13. Rosacea: Treatment for Rosacea From A GP. Page Last Reviewed: 15 January 2020. NHS https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/rosacea/causes/#triggers-of-rosacea Accessed: 16 December 2021
  14. All About Rosacea. National Rosacea Society https://www.rosacea.org/patients/allaboutrosacea.php Accessed: 16 December 2021
  15. Do You Have To Treat Rosacea? Worried Your Rosacea Is Not Serious Enough To Treat? American Academy of Dermatology | Association https://www.aad.org/public/diseases/rosacea/treatment/necessary Accessed: 16 December 2021

Topic Last Updated: 16 December 2021 – Topic Last Reviewed: 16 December 2021
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