“You don’t have to put up with incontinence.
You can ask your doctor for a referral to a continence nurse
or pelvic floor physiotherapist to help strengthen your…”.1

Umbrella

What may the Incontinence Umbrella include?

Depending on the Source (DotS) this Umbrella may include:

  • Bladder Incontinence
  • Bladder Weakness
  • Bowel Incontinence
  • Continence
  • Fecal Incontinence (FI)
  • Incontinence
  • Light Bladder Leakage (LBL)
  • Overactive Bladder (OAB)
  • Urinary Incontinence (UI)
  • Wind

Incontinence

What is incontinence?

DotS the definition of incontinence may vary. The Continence Foundation of Australia’s definition is:

“Incontinence describes any accidental or involuntary loss of:

  • Urine (wee) from the bladder – known as urinary incontinence
  • Faeces (poo) or flatus (wind) from the bowel – known as faecal incontinence

Incontinence can range in severity from a small leak to complete loss of bladder or bowel control”.2

Urinary Incontinence

What is urinary incontinence (UI)?

DotS the definition of UI may vary. In What Is Incontinence? What Is Urinary Incontinence? the World Federation for Incontinence and Pelvic Problem’s (WFIPP) Support In Continence explain:

“Urinary incontinence (UI) is the involuntary release of urine at the wrong time or the wrong place”.3

Faecal Incontinence

What is faecal incontinence (FI)?

DotS the definition of FI may vary. In What Is Incontinence? What Is Faecal Incontinence? WFIPP’s Support In Continence explain:

“Faecal incontinence (FI) is the involuntary loss of liquid or solid stools causing social or hygienic inconvenience. You might also hear it referred to bowel or stool incontinence”.4

Menopause

Is there an association between menopause and increased difficulty with bladder and bowel control?

The Continence Foundation of Australia note:

“Menopause is a time of change in a woman’s life. One of the changes that many women notice is increased difficulty with bladder and bowel control”.5

Symptoms

What are the most common menopause bladder and bowel control symptoms?

In Menopause: Symptoms the Continence Foundation of Australia elaborate on:

Incontinence“During menopause, passing urine frequently and the urgent need to pass urine are the most common incontinence symptoms. Other symptoms include:

  • Leakage of urine with coughs, sneezes, or exercise
  • Leakage of urine on the way to the toilet
  • Getting up one or more times per night to pass urine (nocturia)
  • Frequent urinary tract infections
  • Rushing to the toilet to open bowels
  • Being unable to control wind
  • Constipation”.6

Treatment

What is it important to note about incontinence treatment?

In Incontinence Conditions From A – Z the (United States) National Association for Continence explain:

“If you’re under the impression that there isn’t much that can be done to treat incontinence, you’re in for a surprise. Treatments for incontinence have come a long way in recent years, and with so many tools and options available, there’s no reason to wait another second to get your condition under control. If you believe that you’re encountering an issue with either your bladder or bowel, don’t shrug it off. Talk to your physician. The sooner you do, the sooner you can start treating the cause of your issue. If you’ve already been to your physician or just want to get educated with possible treatment options before you go, this is a great place to start”.7

Helpline

May some Countries have a national continence/incontinence Helpline?

Yes. Your Country may have a Helpline similar to the Continence Foundation of Australia’s National Continence Helpline.

Toilet Maps, Cards or Apps

May some Countries have toilet maps, cards or Apps?

Yes. Your Country may have a toilet map similar to Australia’s National Public Toilet Map which in National Public Toilet Map: About the Toilet Map explains:

“The National Public Toilet Map shows the location of more than 23,000 public and private public facilities across Australia, including toilets, adult change and baby care. Information is provided about each toilet, such as location, accessibility details, opening hours and features like sharps disposal and showers”.8

Or your Country may have a card or App similar to the (United Kingdom) Bladder & Bowel Community’s (B&B) Free Just Can’t Wait Toilet Card.

Health Care Provider

What if I think I have incontinence?

If you think you have incontinence, it may be in your best interest to talk to your health care provider about this. The Continence Foundation of Australia encourage us to seek help and note:

“You should not ignore these problems because without help, they rarely go away and usually get worse over time. They can interfere with work, social activities, as well as sexual and personal relationships”.9

In What Is Menopause? Perimenopause, Menopause and Postmenopause – Postmenopause: Bladder Health the JH also encourage us to seek help and explain:

“You don’t have to put up with incontinence. You can ask your doctor for a referral to a continence nurse or pelvic floor physiotherapist to help strengthen your pelvic floor muscles”.10

Health Topics A-Z

Where may I find Health Topics A-Z related to Incontinence?

In Health Topics A-Z you may find:

Links

Where may I find Links related to Incontinence?

Your Country may have Links similar to:

Sources

Where may I find the Sources quoted?

You may find the Sources quoted at:

Sources

  1. What Is Menopause? Perimenopause, Menopause and Postmenopause – Postmenopause: Bladder Health. Last Updated: 09 May 2023 | Last Reviewed: 19 August 2022. Jean Hailes for Women’s Health https://www.jeanhailes.org.au/health-a-z/menopause/about-menopause Accessed: 30 October 2023
  2. About Continence: Understanding Incontinence – What Is Incontinence? Last Updated: 06 July 2022. Last Reviewed: 23 March 2020. Continence Foundation of Australia https://www.continence.org.au/about-continence/understanding-incontinence Accessed: 30 October 2023
  3. What Is Incontinence? What Is Urinary Incontinence? Support In Incontinence https://www.supportincontinence.org/what-is-incontinence/ Accessed: 30 October 2023
  4. What Is Incontinence? What Is Faecal Incontinence? Support In Incontinence https://www.supportincontinence.org/what-is-incontinence/ Accessed: 30 October 2023
  5. Menopause. Last Updated: 15 July 2021. Last Reviewed: 01 April 2020. Continence Foundation of Australia https://www.continence.org.au/who-it-affects/women/menopause Accessed: 30 October 2023
  6. Menopause – Symptoms. Last Updated: 15 July 2021. Last Reviewed: 01 April 2020. Continence Foundation of Australia https://www.continence.org.au/who-it-affects/women/menopause Accessed: 30 October 2023
  7. Therapies and Procedures: Managing Your Condition. National Association for Continence https://nafc.org/therapies-and-procedures/ Accessed: 30 October 2023
  8. Welcome To the National Public Toilet Map. National Continence Program https://www.bladderandbowel.org/help-information/just-cant-wait-card/ Accessed: 30 October 2023
  9. Menopause – Symptoms. Last Updated: 15 July 2021. Last Reviewed: 01 April 2020. Continence Foundation of Australia https://www.continence.org.au/who-it-affects/women/menopause Accessed: 30 October 2023
  10. What Is Menopause? Perimenopause, Menopause and Postmenopause – Postmenopause: Bladder Health. Last Updated: 09 May 2023 | Last Reviewed: 19 August 2022. Jean Hailes for Women’s Health https://www.jeanhailes.org.au/health-a-z/menopause/about-menopause Accessed: 30 October 2023
Topic Last Updated: 24 May 2024 – Topic Last Reviewed: 30 October 2023

Print Friendly, PDF & Email