“Menopause is a time of change in a woman’s life. One of the changes many women notice is increased difficulty with bladder and bowel control”.1

Umbrella
What may the Menopause Bladder and Bowel Control Problems Umbrella include?

Depending on the Source (DotS) this Umbrella may include:

  • Bladder Control
  • Bowel Control
  • Continence
  • Incontinence
  • Light Bladder Leakage (LBL)
  • Urinary Control

Menopause

Is there an association between menopause and increased difficulty with bladder and bowel control?

The Continence Foundation of Australia explain:

Menopause Bladder and Bowel Control Problems“Menopause is a time of change in a woman’s life. One of the changes many women notice is increased difficulty with bladder and bowel control”.2

Symptoms

What are the most common menopause bladder and bowel symptoms?

In Menopause: Common Symptoms the Continence Foundation of Australia elaborate on:

“Passing urine frequently and rushing to the toilet (urgency) to pass urine are the most common symptoms. Other symptoms include:

  • Leakage of urine with coughs, sneezes, or exercise
  • Leakage of urine on the way to the toilet
  • Getting up twice or more overnight to pass urine
  • Frequent urinary tract infections
  • Rushing to the toilet to open bowels
  • Being unable to control wind, and
  • Constipation”.3

In Menopause: Symptoms – Common Menopausal Symptoms the (United Kingdom) NHS (National Health Service) also note common menopausal symptoms include:

  • “Recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs)”.4

Urinary Tract Infection

What is a urinary tract infection (UTI)?

DotS the definition of a UTI may vary. The (Australian) Jean Hailes for Women’s Health’s (JH) definition is:

“A UTI is an infection of the urinary tract that can affect the:

  • Bladder (Cystitis)
  • Urethra (Urethritis)
  • Vagina (Vaginitis)
  • Kidneys (Pyelonephritis)”.5

In Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs): What Is A UTI? the JH also note:

“The most common type of UTI in women is cystitis (infection of the bladder)”.6

Diary

May keeping a diary be helpful?Menopause Bladder and Bowel Control Problems

Yes. In Talking To Your Doctor the (United States) National Association for Continence elaborate on:

“By keeping a bladder or bowel diary, you are not only educating and informing yourself, you are assuming responsibility for playing a role in getting diagnosed correctly”.7

Helpline

May some Countries have a national continence/incontinence Helpline?

Yes. Your Country may have a Helpline similar to the Continence Foundation of Australia’s Continence Helpline.

Toilet Maps, Cards or Apps

May some Countries have toilet maps, cards or Apps?

Yes. Your Country may have a toilet map similar to Australia’s National Public Toilet Map which:

“As part of the National Continence Program, the Toilet Map provides information on over 19,000 publicly available toilets across Australia, including accessibility, opening hours and facilities, such as showers & baby change”.8

Or your Country may have a card or App similar to the (United Kingdom) Bladder & Bowel Community’s (B&B) Free Just Can’t Wait Toilet Card.

Health Care Provider

What if I think I have menopause bladder or bowel control problems?

If you think you have menopause bladder or bowel control problems, it may be in your best interest to choose to talk to your health care provider about this.

The Continence Foundation of Australia encourage us to seek help and explain:

“You should not ignore these problems because without help, they rarely go away and usually get worse over time. They can interfere with work, social activities, and sexual and personal relationships. Yet many women do not seek help. It is important that you seek help because the good news is that these problems can be treated, managed and often cured”.9

In Health After Menopause: Incontinence the JH also encourage us to seek help and note:

“Incontinence is not something to be embarrassed about; it is a very common problem that you do not have to tolerate. In many cases, it can be improved with pelvic floor physiotherapy by a continence nurse or pelvic floor physiotherapist”.10

Health Topics A-Z

Where may I find Health Topics related to Menopause Bladder and Bowel Control Problems?

In Health Topics A-Z you may find:

Links

Where may I find Links related to Menopause Bladder and Bowel Control Problems?

Your Country may have Links similar to:

Sources

Where may I find the Sources quoted above?

You may find the Sources at:

Sources

  1. Menopause. Continence Foundation of Australia http://www.continence.org.au/pages/menopause.html Accessed: 10 September 2019
  2. Menopause. Continence Foundation of Australia http://www.continence.org.au/pages/menopause.html Accessed: 10 September 2019
  3. Menopause: Common Symptoms. Continence Foundation of Australia http://www.continence.org.au/pages/menopause.html Accessed: 10 September 2019
  4. Menopause: Symptoms – Common Menopausal Symptoms. Page Last Reviewed: 29 August 2018. NHS (National Health Service) https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/menopause/symptoms/#common-menopausal-symptoms Accessed: 10 September 2019
  5. Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs): What Is A UTI? Last Updated 01 September 2018 — Last Reviewed 04 August 2018. Jean Hailes for Women’s Health http://jeanhailes.org.au/health-a-z/bladder-bowel/urinary-tract-infections-utis Accessed: 10 September 2019
  6. Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs): What Is A UTI? Last Updated 01 September 2018 — Last Reviewed 04 August 2018. Jean Hailes for Women’s Health http://jeanhailes.org.au/health-a-z/bladder-bowel/urinary-tract-infections-utis Accessed: 10 September 2019
  7. Talking To Your Doctor. National Association for Continence https://www.nafc.org/talking-to-your-doctor Accessed: 10 September 2019
  8. Welcome To the National Public Toilet Map. National Continence Program https://toiletmap.gov.au/ Accessed: 10 September 2019
  9. Menopause: Common Symptoms. Continence Foundation of Australia http://www.continence.org.au/pages/menopause.html Accessed: 10 September 2019
  10. Health After Menopause: Continence. Last Updated 18 August 2018 — Last Reviewed 17 December 2017. Jean Hailes for Women’s Health http://jeanhailes.org.au/health-a-z/menopause/health-after-menopause Accessed: 10 September 2019
Topic Last Updated: 19 September 2019 – Topic Last Reviewed: 10 September 2019
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