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World Heart Day 2020 is 29 September. After menopause, a woman’s risk of heart disease and stroke is similar to a man’s. Nearly three times more women can die from heart disease than breast cancer. Read more

“The Release the Pressure (RTP) campaign brings together a diverse coalition of health care organizations – the RTP Heart Health Squad – who are dedicated to…”. Read more

Women and heart disease may not be something many of us think about. But heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women. Find out what you need to know… Read more

After menopause, a woman’s risk for heart disease and stroke increase. Heart disease and stroke are the number 1 killer of women. Read more

National Wear Red Day is February 7 in the United States and Wear Red Day is 14 February in Australia. Your Country may also celebrate Wear Red Day. Read more

February is Go Red for Women and American Heart Month. “Nearly 80 percent of cardiac events can be prevented, cardiovascular diseases continue to be a woman’s greatest health threat”. Read more

Menopause FAQs: Cardiovascular Disease is some Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about menopause, heart disease and stroke. Read more

Is heart disease and stroke (cardiovascular disease) the number 1 killer of women in your Country, not breast cancer?

In Women and Heart Disease the National Heart Foundation of Australia note:

“Heart disease is the single biggest killer of Australian women.

Women are almost three times more likely to die of heart disease than breast cancer.”

In Why Go Red the World Heart Federation also note:

Meno Martha, Heart Disease and StrokeMeno Martha, Heart Disease and Stroke“Heart disease and stroke do not just affect men. In fact it is the leading cause of death in women globally with over two million premature deaths each year: this represents more than cancer, tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS and malaria combined”.

In Spotlight on Women’s Health – An Interview About Heart Health the Office on Women’s Health, United States Department of Health and Human Services, Womenshealth.gov elaborate on:

“Did you know that heart disease is the number one killer of American women, and stroke is fourth? The good news is there are steps you can take to lower your risk of heart disease and stroke at any age. We spoke to Dr. Rachel Dreyer, an Assistant Professor at the Yale School of Medicine who specializes in cardiovascular outcomes research with a focus on women’s health. Dr. Dreyer shares the basics you need to know about heart disease and how to keep your heart healthy”.

In What Cardiologists Want You To Know  in the North American Menopause Society’s Videos Series-2018 cardiovascular risk prevention is discussed:

“In this latest video, What Cardiologists Want You to Know, Dr. Shapiro interviews Dr. Beth Abramson, Associate Professor of Medicine at the University of Toronto. She is Director of Cardiac Prevention and Rehabilitation Centre and Women’s Cardiovascular Health in the Division of Cardiology at St. Michael’s Hospital. Dr Abramson discusses the latest research on weight management, alcohol consumption, use of hormones, and aspirin for cardiovascular risk prevention”.

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Last Updated: 01 January 2019 – Posted: 05 March 2018

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“While some risk factors cannot be changed, others can be controlled or modified to create a more heart-healthy lifestyle by…”. Read more

“Your gender is significant: as a man you are at greater risk of heart disease than a pre-menopausal woman. But once past the menopause, a woman’s risk is similar to a man’s”. Read more

“Many women think the signs of a heart attack are unmistakable — the image of the elephant comes to mind — but in fact they can be subtler and sometimes…”. Read more

“Women having a heart attack wait longer before seeking help than men do — one reason women tend to do worse after a heart attack than men”. Read more

“Heart disease is the leading cause of death for women in the United States. About 1 in every 5 female deaths are linked to heart disease”. Read more

“If I have just one risk factor for heart disease—say, I’m overweight or I have high blood cholesterol—aren’t I more or less “safe”? Absolutely not. Each risk factor greatly…”. Read more

“Blood pressure can increase after menopause, as can total cholesterol and LDL, or ‘bad cholesterol’. There can also be a decrease in HDL, or ‘good cholesterol’”. Read more

“If you’re having a tough time with symptoms of menopause but worry about how hormone therapy will affect your heart, talk with your doctor to…”. Read more

“A cardiac arrest is when your heart suddenly stops pumping blood around your body. When your heart stops pumping blood, your brain is starved of oxygen”. Read more

“Having heart failure doesn’t mean that your heart has stopped working, but that your heart needs some support to help it work better”. Read more