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World Heart Day 2021 is on 29 September. Did you know that after menopause, a woman’s risk of heart disease increases? Read more

Wear Red Day 2021 is Friday, February 5 and American Heart Month is February. Are you and your Country going red this February? Read more

World Heart Day 2020 is 29 September. After menopause, a woman’s risk of heart disease and stroke is similar to a man’s. Nearly three times more women can die from heart disease than breast cancer. Read more

“Our mission is to join Black women in taking preventive action to protect their heart health. We’re encouraging Black women to be a part of a healthy blood pressure movement”. Read more

Women and heart disease may not be something many of us think about. But heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women. Find out what you need to know… Read more

After menopause, a woman’s risk for heart disease and stroke increase. Heart disease and stroke are the number 1 killer of women. Read more

National Wear Red Day is February 7 in the United States and Wear Red Day is 14 February in Australia. Your Country may also celebrate Wear Red Day. Read more

February is Go Red for Women and American Heart Month. “Nearly 80 percent of cardiac events can be prevented, cardiovascular diseases continue to be a woman’s greatest health threat”. Read more

Menopause FAQs: Cardiovascular Disease is some Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about menopause, heart disease and stroke. Read more

Is heart disease and stroke (cardiovascular disease) the number 1 killer of women in your Country, not breast cancer?

In Women and Heart Disease the National Heart Foundation of Australia note:Meno Martha, Heart Disease and Stroke
Meno Martha, Heart Disease and Stroke

“Heart disease is the single biggest killer of Australian women.

Women are almost three times more likely to die of heart disease than breast cancer.”

In Spotlight on Women’s Health – An Interview About Heart Health the Office on Women’s Health, United States Department of Health and Human Services, Womenshealth.gov elaborate on:

“Did you know that heart disease is the number one killer of American women, and stroke is fourth? The good news is there are steps you can take to lower your risk of heart disease and stroke at any age. We spoke to Dr. Rachel Dreyer, an Assistant Professor at the Yale School of Medicine who specializes in cardiovascular outcomes research with a focus on women’s health. Dr. Dreyer shares the basics you need to know about heart disease and how to keep your heart healthy”.

In What Cardiologists Want You To Know  in the North American Menopause Society’s Videos Series-2018 cardiovascular risk prevention is discussed:

“In this latest video, What Cardiologists Want You to Know, Dr. Shapiro interviews Dr. Beth Abramson, Associate Professor of Medicine at the University of Toronto. She is Director of Cardiac Prevention and Rehabilitation Centre and Women’s Cardiovascular Health in the Division of Cardiology at St. Michael’s Hospital. Dr Abramson discusses the latest research on weight management, alcohol consumption, use of hormones, and aspirin for cardiovascular risk prevention”.

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Last Updated: 01 January 2019 – Posted: 05 March 2018

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“Heart disease increases with age, including during and after menopause. In middle age women tend to develop more risk factors for heart disease, in part due to…”. Read more

“If you already have heart disease or you have a history of blood clots, the risks of hormone therapy have been clearly shown to outweigh any potential benefits”. Read more

“While some risk factors cannot be changed, others can be controlled or modified to create a more heart-healthy lifestyle by…”. Read more

“Atherosclerosis is the build-up of fatty material (atheroma) inside your arteries. It is what causes most heart attacks and strokes”. Read more

“Some women who are going through the menopause may be more aware of their heart beating, or might feel as though their heart is racing. These are called palpitations”. Read more

“Knowing your numbers is an important part of keeping your heart healthy. Checking your blood pressure, cholesterol levels and blood sugar levels…”. Read more

“Women having a heart attack wait longer before seeking help than men do — one reason women tend to do worse after a heart attack than men”. Read more

“Many women think the signs of a heart attack are unmistakable — the image of the elephant comes to mind — but in fact they can be subtler and sometimes…”. Read more

“While you may have had normal blood pressure most of your life, your chances of developing high blood pressure increase considerably after menopause”. Read more

“Heart failure means your heart isn’t pumping blood around your body as well as it should. It doesn’t mean your heart has stopped working, however you may need support to…”. Read more