“Dementia is the loss of cognitive functioning
— thinking, remembering, and reasoning —
to such an extent that it interferes with a person’s…”.1

Umbrella
What may the Dementia Umbrella include?

Depending on the Source (DotS) this Umbrella may include:

  • Alzheimer’s Disease (AD)
  • Dementia
  • Lewy Body Dementia
  • Mixed Dementia
  • Vascular Dementia

Terminology

Is dementia an umbrella term?

In About Dementia: Types of Dementia Dementia Australia explain:

“Dementia is the umbrella term for a number of neurological conditions, of which the major symptom includes a global decline in brain function”.2

In About Alzheimer’s & Dementia: What Is Dementia? Alzheimer’s Disease International (ADI) also note:

“Dementia is an umbrella term for a collection of symptoms that are caused by disorders affecting the brain and impact on memory, thinking, behaviour and emotion”.3

Definition

What is dementia?

DotS the definition of dementia may vary. The (United States) National Institute on Aging’s (NIA) definition is:

“Dementia is the loss of cognitive functioning — thinking, remembering, and reasoning — to such an extent that it interferes with a person’s daily life and activities”.4

The World Health Organization’s (WHO) definition is:

“Dementia is a syndrome – usually of a chronic or progressive nature – that leads to deterioration in cognitive function (i.e. the ability to process thought) beyond what might be expected from the usual consequences of biological ageing”.5

Symptoms

What may be symptoms of dementia?

In About Alzheimer’s & Dementia: What Is Dementia? the ADI elaborate on:

“The specific symptoms a person living with dementia experiences will depend upon what parts of the brain are affected and/or the specific disease that is causing their dementia. Symptoms may include:

  • Loss of memory
  • Difficulty in finding the right words or understanding what people are saying
  • Difficulty in performing previously routine tasks
  • Personality and mood changes”.6

Aging

Is dementia a normal part of aging?

According to the WHO:

  • “Although dementia mainly affects older people, it is not an inevitable consequence of ageing”.7

Cause

What may cause dementia?

In Dementia: Key Facts the WHO note:

“Dementia results from a variety of diseases and injuries that primarily or secondarily affect the brain”.8

Alzheimer’s Disease

What is the association between Alzheimer’s Disease and dementia?

In About Alzheimer’s & Dementia: What Is Dementia? the ADI elaborate on:

“The most common is Alzheimer’s disease, which affects 50-60% of people with dementia”.9

In Basics of Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia: Frequently Asked Questions About Alzheimer’s Disease – What Is the Difference Between Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia? the NIA answer this and more questions:

“Alzheimer’s disease is a type of dementia. Dementia is a loss of thinking, remembering, and reasoning skills that interferes with a person’s daily life and activities. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia among older people”.10

Women

In women, how common is dementia?

In Why Is Dementia Different for Women? according to the (United Kingdom) Alzheimer’s Society:

“More women are affected by dementia than men. Worldwide, women with dementia outnumber men 2 to 1”.11

In Dementia: Disproportionate Impact on Women the WHO note:

“Globally, dementia has a disproportionate impact on women. Sixty-five percent of total deaths due to dementia are women, and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) due to dementia are roughly 60% higher in women than in men. Additionally, women provide the majority of informal care for people living with dementia, accounting for 70% of carer hours”.12

Menopause

Is there an association between menopause and dementia?

In Menopause FAQs: Menopause Symptoms – Q. My memory is just not as good as it used to be, and it’s really bothering me. Does menopause cause this? Will it ever get better? the North American Menopause Society elaborate on:

“A. Memory and other cognitive abilities change throughout life. Difficulty concentrating and remembering are common complaints during perimenopause and the years right afterward. Some data imply that even though there is a trend for memory to be worse during the menopause transition, memory after the transition is as good as it was before. Memory problems may be more related to normal cognitive aging, mood, and other factors than to menopause or the menopause transition”.13

In Memory & Dementia: Menopause & Memory the (Australian) Jean Hailes for Women’s Health also note:

“Perimenopause (when periods start to become irregular, and menopause symptoms begin) is known to be a time of memory lapses, poor concentration and ‘foggy’ thinking. Sixty per cent of women report memory complaints with menopause”.14

Depression

Is there an association between depression and dementia?

In Look After Your Mind: Keeping Your Brain Active Is Important To Keep It Functioning Well – Depression Your Brain Matters explain:

“Depression is often associated with an increased risk of dementia. It is important to seek medical advice should you recognise the symptoms of depression and to look after your psychological wellbeing”.15

Prevention

How may dementia be prevented?

In Brain Health the (United States) Alzheimer’s Association explain:

“Research is still evolving, but evidence is strong that people can reduce their risk of cognitive decline by making key lifestyle changes, including participating in regular physical activity, staying socially engaged, and maintaining good heart health”.16

Health Care Provider

What if I would like reassurance I do not have dementia?

If you would like reassurance you do not have dementia, it may be in your best interest to choose to talk to your health care provider about this.

In Dementia Guide: About Dementia the (United Kingdom) NHS also note:

“It’s normal for your memory to be affected by stress, tiredness, certain illnesses and medicines. But if you’re becoming increasingly forgetful, particularly if you’re over the age of 65, it’s a good idea to talk to a GP about the early signs of dementia”.17

Who is a GP?

DotS and/or DotC (Depending on the Country) a GP may be a qualified and registered general practitioner, a medical practitioner, a medical doctor or a doctor.

Health Topics A-Z

Where may I find Health Topics related to Dementia?

In Health Topics A-Z you may find:

Links

Where may I find Links related to Dementia?

Your Country may have Links similar to:

Sources

Where may I find the Sources quoted?

You may find the Sources quoted at:

Sources

  1. Basics of Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia: What Is Dementia? Symptoms, Types, and Diagnosis.  Content Reviewed: 02 July 2021. National Institute on Aging https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/what-dementia Accessed: 29 March 2022
  2. About Dementia: Types of Dementia. Dementia Australia https://www.dementia.org.au/information/about-dementia/types-of-dementia Accessed: 29 March 2022
  3. About Alzheimer’s & Dementia: What Is Dementia? Alzheimer’s Disease International https://www.alzint.org/about/ Accessed: 29 March 2022
  4. Basics of Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia: What Is Dementia? Symptoms, Types, and Diagnosis.  Content Reviewed: 02 July 2021. National Institute on Aging https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/what-dementia Accessed: 29 March 2022
  5. Dementia: Key Facts. 02 September 2021. World Health Organization https://www.who.int/en/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/dementia Accessed: 29 March 2022
  6. About Alzheimer’s & Dementia: What Is Dementia? Alzheimer’s Disease International https://www.alz.co.uk/about-dementia Accessed: 29 March 2022
  7. Dementia: Key Facts. 02 September 2021. World Health Organization https://www.who.int/en/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/dementia Accessed: 29 March 2022
  8. Dementia: Key Facts. 02 September 2021. World Health Organization https://www.who.int/en/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/dementia Accessed: 29 March 2022
  9. About Alzheimer’s & Dementia: What Is Dementia? Alzheimer’s Disease International https://www.alzint.org/about/ Accessed: 29 March 2022
  10. Basics of Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia: Frequently Asked Questions About Alzheimer’s Disease – What Is the Difference Between Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia? Content Reviewed: 04 August 2021. National Institute on Aging https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/frequently-asked-questions-about-alzheimers-disease#difference Accessed: 29 March 2022
  11. Dementia: Disproportionate Impact on Women. 02 September 2021. World Health Organization https://www.who.int/en/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/dementia Accessed: 29 March 2022
  12. What Are the Costs of Dementia Care In the UK? Published November 2019. Alzheimer’s Society https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/about-us/policy-and-influencing/dementia-scale-impact-numbers Accessed: 29 March 2022
  13. Menopause FAQs: Menopause Symptoms – Q. My memory is just not as good as it used to be, and it’s really bothering me. Does menopause cause this? Will it ever get better? North American Menopause Society https://www.menopause.org/for-women/menopause-faqs-menopause-symptoms Accessed: 29 March 2022
  14. Memory & Dementia: Menopause & Memory. Last Updated: 07 December 2020 | Last Reviewed: 10 March 2014. Jean Hailes for Women’s Health https://jeanhailes.org.au/health-a-z/mental-emotional-health/memory-dementia Accessed: 29 March 2022
  15. Look After Your Mind: Keeping Your Brain Active Is Important To Keep It Functioning Well – Depression. Your Brain Matters https://www.dementia.org.au/information/risk-reduction/look-after-your-mind Accessed: 29 March 2022
  16. Brain Health. Alzheimer’s Association https://www.alz.org/we_can_help_brain_health_maintain_your_brain.asp Accessed: 29 March 2022
  17. Dementia Guide: About Dementia. Page Last Reviewed: 25 June 2020. NHS https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/dementia/about/? Accessed: 29 March 2022
Topic Last Updated: 24 October 2022 – Topic Last Reviewed: 29 March 2022

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