“Women in their 60s are more than TWICE AS LIKELY to develop Alzheimer’s disease over the rest of their lives as they are to develop breast cancer”.1

Umbrella
What may the Alzheimer’s Disease Umbrella include?

Depending on the Source (DotS) this Umbrella may include:

  • Alzheimer’s
  • Alzheimer’s Disease (AD)
  • Dementia

Alzheimer’s Disease

What is Alzheimer’s disease?

DotS the definition of Alzheimer’s disease may vary. The (United States) National Institute on Aging’s (NIA) definition is:

“Alzheimer’s disease is an irreversible, progressive brain disorder that slowly destroys memory and thinking skills and, eventually, the ability to carry out the simplest tasks. In most people with the disease—those with the late-onset type—symptoms first appear in their mid-60s”.2

Dementia

What is the association between dementia and Alzheimer’s disease?

In Alzheimer’s Disease Alzheimer’s Disease International explain:

“Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia and accounts for 50%-75% of all cases. It destroys brain cells and nerves disrupting the transmitters which carry messages in the brain, particularly those responsible for storing memories”.3

In Basics of Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia: Frequently Asked Questions About Alzheimer’s Disease – What Is the Difference Between Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia? the NIA answer this and more questions:

“Alzheimer’s disease is a type of dementia. Dementia is a loss of thinking, remembering, and reasoning skills that interferes with a person’s daily life and activities. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia among older people. Other types of dementia include frontotemporal disorders and Lewy body dementia”.4

Early Signs and Symptoms

What are early signs and symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease?

In 10 Early Signs and Symptoms of Alzheimer’s the (United States) Alzheimer’s Association elaborate on:

  1. “Memory loss that disrupts daily life…
  2. Challenges in planning or solving problems…
  3. Difficulty completing familiar tasks…
  4. Confusion with time or place…
  5. Trouble understanding visual images and spatial relationships…
  6. New problems with words in speaking or writing…
  7. Misplacing things and losing the ability to retrace steps…
  8. Decreased or poor judgement…
  9. Withdrawal from work or social activities…
  10. Changes in mood and personality…”.5

Common or Not

How common is Alzheimer’s disease?

In the United States according to the NIA:

“Estimates vary, but experts suggest that more than 5 million Americans may have Alzheimer’s”.6

In the United Kingdom (UK) according to Alzheimer’s Research UK on page four in their booklet What Is Alzheimer’s Disease?:

“Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia, affecting around six in every 10 people with dementia”.7

Women and Alzheimer’s Disease

In women, how common is Alzheimer’s disease?

In Women and Alzheimer’s: Quick Facts the (United States) Alzheimer’s Association note:

“Almost TWO-THIRDS of Americans living with Alzheimer’s are women”.8

In Women and Alzheimer’s: Quick Facts the Alzheimer’s Association also note:

“Women in their 60s are more than TWICE AS LIKELY to develop Alzheimer’s disease over the rest of their lives as they are to develop breast cancer”.9

In About Alzheimer’s: Know the Numbers the (United States) Women’s Alzheimer’s Movement elaborate on:

  • “2/3 of those diagnosed are women—and no one knows why
  • 2/3 of Alzheimer’s caregivers are also women, many of who will have to take time off or resign from their jobs
  • A woman in her 60s is twice as likely to develop Alzheimer’s over the course of her lifetime than breast cancer
  • After 60, a woman has a 1 in 5 chance of developing Alzheimer’s”.10

Alzheimer’s Disease

Prevention

How can Alzheimer’s be prevented?

In Basics of Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia: Frequently Asked Questions About Alzheimer’s Disease – Is There A Way To Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease? the NIA explain:

“Currently, there is no definitive evidence about what can prevent Alzheimer’s disease or age-related cognitive decline. What we do know is that a healthy lifestyle—one that includes a healthy diet, physical activity, appropriate weight, and no smoking—can lower the risk of certain chronic diseases and boost overall health and well-being. Scientists are very interested in the possibility that a healthy lifestyle might delay, slow down, or even prevent Alzheimer’s. They are also studying the role of social activity and intellectual stimulation in Alzheimer’s disease risk”.11

In Brain Health the Alzheimer’s Association elaborate on:

“Research is still evolving, but evidence is strong that people can reduce their risk of cognitive decline by making key lifestyle changes, including participating in regular physical activity, staying socially engaged, and maintaining good heart health”.12

In Evidence-Based Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of 243 Observational Prospective Studies and 153 Randomised Controlled Trials: Conclusions published in July 2020, Yu et al note:

“Twenty-one clinical evidence-based suggestions are proposed, offering clinicians and stakeholders an evidence-based guideline for AD prevention. With credible though inconclusive evidence, the suggestions targeted 10 risk factors including diabetes, hyperhomocysteinaemia, poor BMI management, reduced education, hypertension in midlife, orthostatic hypotension, head trauma, less cognitive activity, stress and depression”.13

Health Care Provider

What if I would like reassurance I do not have Alzheimer’s disease?

If you would like reassurance you do not have Alzheimer’s disease, it may be in your best interest to choose to talk to your health care provider about this.

In Memory, Forgetfulness, and Aging: What’s Normal and What’s Not? the NIA elaborate on:

“What’s the difference between normal, age-related forgetfulness and a serious memory problem? It’s normal to forget things once in a while as we age, but serious memory problems make it hard to do everyday things like driving, using the phone, and finding your way home”.14

In Dementia Guide: About Dementia the (United Kingdom) NHS also note:

“Memory loss can be annoying if it happens occasionally, but if it’s affecting your daily life, or it’s worrying you, or someone you know, you should get help from a GP.

Dementia is not only about memory loss. It can also affect the way you speak, think, feel and behave.

It’s also important to remember that dementia is not a natural part of ageing”.15

Who is a GP?

DotS and/or DotC (Depending on the Country) a GP may be a qualified and registered general practitioner, a medical practitioner, a medical doctor or a doctor.

Health Topics A-Z

Where may I find Health Topics related to Alzheimer’s Disease?

In Health Topics A-Z you may find:

Links

Where may I find Links related to Alzheimer’s Disease?

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Sources

Where may I find the Sources quoted?

You may find the Sources quoted at:

Sources

  1. Women and Alzheimer’s: Quick Facts. Alzheimer’s Association https://www.alz.org/alzheimers-dementia/what-is-alzheimers/women-and-alzheimer-s Accessed: 25 June 2021
  2. Basics of Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia: What Is Alzheimer’s Disease? Content Reviewed: 16 May 2017. National Institute on Aging https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/what-alzheimers-disease Accessed: 25 June 2021
  3. Alzheimer’s Disease. Alzheimer’s Disease International https://www.alz.co.uk/info/alzheimers-disease Accessed: 25 June 2021
  4. Basics of Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia: Frequently Asked Questions About Alzheimer’s Disease – What Is the Difference Between Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia? Content Reviewed: 30 December 2019. National Institute on Aging https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/frequently-asked-questions-about-alzheimers-disease#difference Accessed: 25 June 2021
  5. 10 Early Signs and Symptoms of Alzheimer’s. Alzheimer’s Association https://www.alz.org/alzheimers-dementia/10_signs Accessed: 25 June 2021
  6. Basics of Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia: What Is Alzheimer’s Disease? How Many Americans Alzheimer’s Disease? Content Reviewed: 16 May 2017. National Institute on Aging https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/what-alzheimers-disease Accessed: 25 June 2021
  7. What Is Alzheimer’s Disease? Updated: May 2018:4. Alzheimer’s Research UK https://www.alzheimersresearchuk.org/wp-content/plugins/mof_bl_0.2.9/downloads/what%20is%20alz.pdf Accessed: 25 June 2021
  8. Women and Alzheimer’s: Quick Facts. Alzheimer’s Association https://www.alz.org/alzheimers-dementia/what-is-alzheimers/women-and-alzheimer-s Accessed: 25 June 2021
  9. Women and Alzheimer’s: Quick Facts. Alzheimer’s Association https://www.alz.org/alzheimers-dementia/what-is-alzheimers/women-and-alzheimer-s Accessed: 25 June 2021
  10. About Alzheimer’s: Know the Numbers. Women’s Alzheimer’s Movement https://thewam.wpengine.com/?page_id=171 Accessed: 25 June 2021
  11. Basics of Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia: Frequently Asked Questions About Alzheimer’s Disease – Is There A Way To Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease? Content Reviewed: 30 December 2019. National Institute on Aging https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/frequently-asked-questions-about-alzheimers-disease#prevent Accessed: 25 June 2021
  12. Brain Health. Alzheimer’s Association https://www.alz.org/we_can_help_brain_health_maintain_your_brain.asp Accessed: 25 June 2021
  13. Yu, J-T., et al. Evidence-Based Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of 243 Observational Prospective Studies and 153 Randomised Controlled Trials: Conclusions. July 2020 https://jnnp.bmj.com/content/early/2020/06/01/jnnp-2019-321913 Accessed: 25 June 2021
  14. Memory, Forgetfulness, and Aging: What’s Normal and What’s Not? Content Reviewed: 21 October 2020. National Institute on Aging https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/memory-forgetfulness-and-aging-whats-normal-and-whats-not Accessed: 25 June 2021
  15. Dementia Guide: About Dementia. Page Last Reviewed: 25 June 2020. NHS https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/dementia/about/? Accessed: 25 June 2021

Topic Last Updated: 10 July 2021 – Topic Last Reviewed: 25 June 2021
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