“Hirsutism is where women have thick, dark hair on their face, neck, chest, tummy, lower back, buttocks or thighs”.1

Umbrella
What may the Hirsutism Umbrella include?

Depending on the Source (DotS) this Umbrella may include:

  • Hirsutism
  • Ovarian Hyperthecosis

Definition

What is hirsutism?

DotS the definition of hirsutism may vary. The (United Kingdom) NHS’s (National Health Service) definition is:

“Hirsutism is where women have thick, dark hair on their face, neck, chest, tummy, lower back, buttocks or thighs”.2

The (United States) Mayo Clinic’s definition is:

“Hirsutism (HUR-soot-iz-um) is a condition in women that results in excessive growth of dark or coarse hair in a male-like pattern — face, chest and back”.3

Cause

What may cause hirsutism?

In Excessive Hair Growth (Hirsutism) the (United States) Cleveland Clinic explain:

“Hirsutism may be caused by high levels of androgen, menopause-related hormone changes, or disorders of the adrenal glands or ovaries”.4

Menopause

Is menopause associated with an increase in facial hair?

The Cleveland Clinic note:

Hirsutism

  • “The hormonal changes of menopause may lead to increased facial hair (mustache and whiskers)”.5

Same or Not

Is the increased in facial hair associated with menopause, the same as hirsutism?

No. In Excessive Hair Growth (Hirsutism) the NHS explain:

“Most women get more hair on their face and body as they get older, particularly after the menopause. But this is finer hair and it’s not the same as hirsutism”.6

Treatment

How may hirsutism be treated?

In Hirsutism: Diagnosis & Treatment – Treatment the Mayo Clinic elaborate on:

“Treatment of hirsutism with no sign of endocrine disorder is not necessary. For women who do need or seek treatment, it may involve treating any underlying disorder, developing a self-care routine for unwanted hair, and trying various therapies and medications”.7

Health Care Provider

What if I think I have hirsutism?

If you think you have hirsutism, it may be in your best interest to choose to talk to your health care provider about this. Together you can clarify your signs and symptoms, discuss your options and if required, agree on who may be the most appropriate health care provider to help you.

Health Topics A-Z

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Links

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Sources

Where may I find the Sources quoted?

You may find the Sources quoted at:

Sources

  1. Excessive Hair Growth (Hirsutism). Page Last Reviewed: 09 July 2019. NHS (National Health Service) https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/hirsutism/ Accessed: 18 May 2020
  2. Excessive Hair Growth (Hirsutism). Page Last Reviewed: 09 July 2019. NHS (National Health Service) https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/hirsutism/ Accessed: 18 May 2020
  3. Hirsutism: Symptoms & Causes – Overview. 14 December 2019. Mayo Clinic https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hirsutism/symptoms-causes/syc-20354935 Accessed: 18 May 2020
  4. Excessive Hair Growth (Hirsutism). This Document Was Last Reviewed on: 13 January 2018. Cleveland Clinic https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/14523-excessive-hair-growth-hirsutism Accessed: 18 May 2020
  5. Excessive Hair Growth (Hirsutism): Overview – What Causes Hirsutism? This Document Was Last Reviewed on: 13 January 2018. Cleveland Clinic https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/14523-excessive-hair-growth-hirsutism Accessed: 18 May 2020
  6. Excessive Hair Growth (Hirsutism): Overview – What Causes Hirsutism? Page Last Reviewed: 09 July 2019. NHS (National Health Service) https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/hirsutism/ Accessed: 18 May 2020
  7. Hirsutism: Diagnosis & Treatment – Treatment. 14 December 2019. Mayo Clinic https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hirsutism/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20354941 Accessed: 18 May 2020
Topic Last Updated: 18 May 2020 – Topic Last Reviewed: 18 May 2020
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