After menopause, a woman’s risk for heart disease and stroke increase. Heart disease and stroke are the number 1 killer of women.

Heart Disease and StrokeMenopause, Heart Disease and StrokeMenopause, Heart Disease and Stroke

Do heart disease and stroke kill more women than breast cancer?

In Why Go Red the World Heart Federation explain:

“Heart disease and stroke do not just affect men.
In fact it is the leading cause of death in women globally with over two million premature deaths each year: this represents more than cancer, tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS and malaria combined”.

Before Menopause

Before menopause, do women have a lower risk of heart disease and stroke than men?

The World Heart Federation (WHF) explain:

“Gender: Your gender is significant: as a man you are at greater risk of heart disease than a pre-menopausal woman. But once past the menopause, a woman’s risk is similar to a man’s. Risk of stroke is similar for men and women”.

After Menopause

After menopause or postmenopause, do women have an increased risk of heart disease and stroke?

In Menopause FAQs: Your Health After Menopause – Q. Do I have to start worrying about heart disease? the North American Menopause Society explain:

“Although many women think of heart disease as a man’s disease, the number one killer of women in North America is cardiovascular disease, that is, diseases of the heart and circulatory system. After age 55, more than half of all the deaths in women are caused by cardiovascular disease. Risk for this disease increases after menopause. Be sure to talk to your healthcare team about what your risks are and how you can reduce them”.

Risk Factors

What are risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD)?

In Cardiovascular Heart Disease: What Increases My Risk of Cardiovascular Heart Disease? the British Heart Foundation elaborate on:

Menopause, Heart Disease and Stroke

“A risk factor is something that increases the chance of getting a condition. The more you have, the higher your chance of CVD. Even if you can’t change all your risk factors, there are steps you can take to reduce your risk.

There are several risk factors for CVD, including:

  • Smoking
  • Stress
  • Alcohol
  • High Blood Pressure
  • High Blood Cholesterol
  • Being Physically Inactive
  • Being Overweight or Obese
  • Diabetes
  • Family History of Heart Disease
  • Ethnic Background
  • Sex – men are more likely to get CVD earlier than women
  • Age – the older you are, the more likely you are to get CVD”.

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Last Updated: 19 February 2020 – Last Revised: 07 February 2020
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