Menopause FAQs: Hot Flushes Pattern includes Menopause FAQs: Hot Flushes Patternsome Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about hot flushes or hot flashes pattern.

Can hot flushes have a pattern?

In Menopause FAQs: Hot Flashes – Q. What are hot flashes? What causes them to happen? the North American Menopause Society (NAMS) explain:

“A. Menopause-related hot flashes usually follow a consistent pattern unique to each woman, but the pattern differs greatly from woman to woman”.

Can hot flushes have a daily pattern?

In Who Gets Hot Flashes and When? the (United States) Breastcancer.org elaborate on:

Menopause FAQs: Hot Flushes Pattern
“The most common time of onset is between six and eight in the morning, and between six to ten at night”.

Can hot flushes have a trigger?

In Menopause: Non-Hormonal Treatment & Relief for Hot Flashes: Knowing the Triggers of Hot Flashes the (United States) Cleveland Clinic note:

“Hot flashes may be precipitated by hot weather, smoking, caffeine, spicy foods, alcohol, tight clothing, heat and stress. Identify and avoid your hot flash “triggers.” Some women notice hot flashes when they eat a lot of sugar. Exercising in warm temperatures might make hot flashes worse”.
Menopause FAQs: Hot Flushes Pattern

How may I look for a pattern with hot flushes?

In Avoiding Hot Flash Triggers Breastcancer.org explain:

“If you can identify your hot flash triggers, you’ve taken the first step in getting the upper hand. Keep a record of when they occur and what you were eating or doing, or how you were feeling at the time. Many women find that stress tops the charts as a trigger. Was that hot flash during your work presentation a random hit, or were you feeling under pressure at the time? Was it a full day of pressure without a break?”

What can I do to change my pattern?

Menopause FAQs: Hot Flushes PatternIn Managing Menopause: Don’t Let Symptoms of Menopause Reduce Your Quality of Life: Hot Flushes/Night Sweats – What You Can Do the (Australian) Jean Hailes for Women’s Health explain:

  • “Reduce common triggers such as caffeine, alcohol, stress, anxiety and spicy foods
  • Carry a hand-held fan to cool your face, or a small water spray to spritz your face
  • Check medications aren’t causing the hot flushes – common culprits include some antidepressants, sleeping pills, steroids and codeine
  • Hypnotherapy, cognitive behavioural therapy and mindfulness therapy have all been shown to help reduce flushing and sweating”.

In Menopause: Hot Flushes – Tips for Reducing Hot Flushes the NHS (National Health Service, England) explain:

“You can try these tips to ease your symptoms:

  • Cut out or reduce coffee and tea
  • Stop smoking
  • Keep the room cool and use a fan (electric or handheld) if necessary
  • If you feel a flush coming on, spray your face with cool water or use a cold gel pack (available from pharmacies)
  • Wear loose layers of light cotton or silk clothes so you can easily take some clothes off if you overheat
  • Have layers of sheets on the bed rather than a duvet so you can remove them as you need to
  • Cut down on alcohol
  • Sip cold or iced drinks
  • Have a lukewarm shower or bath instead of a hot one
  • If medicine is causing your hot flushes, talk to your doctor about other ways you can take it to avoid this side effect”.

Where may I find more Menopause FAQs?

Menopause FAQs: Hot Flushes PatternIn Menopause FAQs: Expert Answers To Frequently Asked Questions About Menopause you may find more Menopause FAQs. The NAMS explain:

“Navigate through the different topics to find answers from the experts on frequently asked questions about menopause, early menopause, menopause symptoms, hot flashes, hormone therapy, health after menopause, finding a menopause specialist, and more”.

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Last Updated: 04 March 2019 – Last Revised: 04 March 2019
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